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first_imgSaturday Night Live this weekend started with a bang, with Alec Baldwin taking on his infamous impersonation of President Donald Trump to start the show’s cold open. Baldwin’s Trump was seated at a grand piano, and began the show with a rendition of Leonard Cohen’s famous song, “Hallelujah.” Throughout the short clip, other members of Trump’s team emerged to join him for the number—namely, Kate McKinnon as Kellyanne Conway, Beck Bennett as Vice President Mike Pence, Mikey Day and Alex Moffat as Eric Trump and Donald Trump Jr., Aidy Bryant as Sarah Sanders, Cecily Strong as Melania Trump, Scarlett Johansson as Ivanka Trump, and, of course, the Grim Reaper.Watch LCD Soundsystem Perform Two New Songs On Saturday Night LiveThis is not the first time that Cohen’s iconic song has been covered on Saturday Night Live. Saturday’s night cover of “Hallelujah” harkens back to McKinnon’s impersonation of Hillary Clinton, when days after the election, she performed a mournful straight rendition of the song. The tone of this weekend’s cover was inherently different than the November rendition with Clinton, with sly references poking fun at the controversy currently surrounding the Trump administration embedded through out the three-minute-long song.  In reference to this and the Trump’s denial of any wrongdoing, the song ended with Baldwin’s Donald Trump issuing a statement to the crowd. “I’m not giving up because I did not do anything wrong. I can’t speak for these people,” Baldwin’s Trump announced, gesturing to the surprised-looking group of his political team gathered behind him around the grand piano.Saturday Night Live Targets EDM Fans With This “When Will The Bass Drop” SkitYou can watch Alec Baldwin as President and the gang consisting of Conway, Pence, Sanders, and Trump’s family tackle Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” below, courtesy of Saturday Night Live.last_img read more

first_img “I come out the airport at the lights and Nicky Butt (a former team-mate and one of Giggs’ coaching assistants) just pulled up next to me and I’m thinking ‘I can’t let Butty know that I’ve just been crying’ so I just give him a little wave and looked the other way and waited for the lights to go green. “It sounds stupid now but it’s just not me, it’s just not me at all. “Driving home from the airport was a release, it was a sort of strange feeling knowing that I didn’t have to come in tomorrow and that it’s a new beginning and it’s exciting. “For the first time in my career it’s going into what is going to be a different season, a different summer.” Giggs still has regrets about his final season as a player at Old Trafford but has none about stepping into the manager’s position, albeit briefly. “It’s been a difficult year playing-wise, (I’ve) not enjoyed the results and the playing so have I contributed? Not as much as I have done previously,” added the former Wales winger. “If I’d have retired last year I’d have gone out on a high: it was the 20th title and everything would have been rosy, but life isn’t like that. “I took the manager’s job without hesitation because who turns the chance of managing Manchester United down? “For 20 years Sir Alex used to say ‘wait until all you lot are managers and you’ll find out how hard it is to pick a team, to leave good players out’, and I was just sat there going ‘Yeah, yeah, yeah, whatever’. “And it’s like having your first baby, you can prep as much as you can but until it comes down to actually living it day in, day out, you can never prepare for it.” Giggs’ wife Stacey noticed a significant change once he took the reins from Moyes. “I did worry a little bit, because I just thought, ‘Oh God, here we go, all the pressure, stress’, but to be fair it hasn’t been that bad,” she said. “The only change is he’s not sat on his a*** watching telly all afternoon.” The final word went to Ferguson, who paid tribute to Giggs’ longevity and contribution to the club. “If you asked me the three or four best players in United’s history, Giggs is definitely one, absolutely no doubt. You can argue with the rest,” said the Scot. Giggs will be the Dutchman’s assistant and intends to get as much out of the role as he can as he takes his first steps into coaching after calling time on his playing career. “I met Louis and the meeting went really well, I liked him instantly and I’m looking forward to working with him and learning from him,” said Giggs in the ITV documentary Life of Ryan: Caretaker Manager to be screened on Thursday night. “It’s been a whirlwind and I wouldn’t change it for the world. “It was just a brilliant experience and one that I thoroughly enjoyed will be all the better for next time it happens.” In the programme Giggs said he found his role as manager stressful and admits he shed tears after their final match of the season at Southampton. “We got off the plane at Manchester Airport and I was saying goodbye to the players, thanking them and potentially saying goodbye to a lot of players for the last time,” he added. “I’m not an emotional man – well, I didn’t think I was – but my car was parked right outside and I thought ‘I need to get in my car here’. I could feel myself getting emotional. “So I get in my car and I just started crying, started getting really emotional and I think it was just a mixture of what I’ve just said, saying goodbye to people for maybe the last time and the pressure that I put myself under. The 40-year-old Welshman took charge of the club’s final four matches of the season after David Moyes was sacked 10 months after succeeding Sir Alex Ferguson. There were calls for Giggs, who made a record 963 appearances for United, to be given the job full-time but the Old Trafford hierarchy opted for the experience of current Holland boss Louis van Gaal. Ryan Giggs believes his experience as Manchester United’s short-term interim manager was good preparation “for the next time it happens”. Press Associationlast_img read more

first_imgPittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown (84) is forced out of bounds by New York Jets’ Dawan Landry (26) during the second half of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014, in East Rutherford, N.J. The Jets won the game 20-13. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)PITTSBURGH (AP) – The only thing worse for the Pittsburgh Steelers than talking about their latest baffling setback may be reliving it.“We’re going to look at it and just slap ourselves on the head because there’s so much left out there,” guard Ramon Foster said. “You can’t make excuses for it. We’ve just got to swallow it up and move on.”The quicker, the better.All the feel-good mojo generated by a three-game winning streak evaporated in three dismal hours on Sunday in a 20-13 loss to the woeful New York Jets. Somehow, the same team that put up a combined 124 points during victories over Houston, Indianapolis and Baltimore needed a last-minute touchdown just to reach the end zone once against one of the NFL’s worst teams.There were turnovers, blown chip-shot field goals, a nonexistent running game and some curious playcalling. There were missed tackles, missed opportunities and another mysterious performance against an also-ran.Somehow the Steelers (6-4) are 0-2 against the Jets and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, two teams who are a combined 1-16 against everyone else.“It’s the NFL, if you don’t show up ready to play your type of game, you’re going to lose,” Steelers wide receiver Lance Moore said. “Our last game was a perfect example of that. We’re hot. We came in high and mighty and a team came in and played better than us.”It wasn’t difficult.New York, which hadn’t led anyone in nearly a month, was up 17-0 at the end of the first quarter as the record-breaking Pittsburgh offense morphed back into the erratic, sputtering version that marked its inconsistent play through September and much of October.The Steelers gave it away four times, including a fumble and a muffed punt by usually surehanded wide receiver Antonio Brown. Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger tossed a pair of interceptions, including a mystifying lob over the middle into triple-coverage with Pittsburgh in New York territory early in the third quarter.“I made a bad throw,” Roethlisberger said.One that dulled some of the brilliance of Roethlisberger’s recent play. He passed for 343 yards but was also sacked twice and spent a significant portion of the game under steady pressure.“We turned the ball over,” Roethlisberger said. “If you turn the ball over it will kill you. You have to give them credit. They played well and we didn’t play well enough.”Oddly, it was the Jets and not the Steelers who took the field with a sense of urgency. Even trailing by three scores in the fourth quarter, Pittsburgh methodically went about its business, preferring not to hurry things up even as time slipped away.Maybe they were simply too stunned. New York came in on an eight-game losing streak, many of those losses in which the Jets weren’t even competitive. That all changed on a balmy early November afternoon in which the Steelers squandered a chance to move into first place in the packed AFC North.As the errors piled up, Pittsburgh didn’t get frustrated, but the Steelers did start to press. Brown began the day with just one fumble on the season despite more than 80 touches. He gave it up after his right arm was hacked from behind by New York’s Muhammad Wilkerson on a quick screen late in the first quarter. Jets safety Jaiquawn Jarrett jumped on it at the Pittsburgh 20. Five plays later New York was up 17 points.Brown tried to catch a Jets punt on the run late in the first half only to have the ball bounce through his arms. New York recovered but missed a field goal, not that it mattered much in the final outcome.“Trying to get us going, get a spark in the game,” Brown said. “Got to make smarter decisions.”So do his teammates. Pittsburgh knows it must find a way to close out beatable opponents beginning next week at Tennessee (2-7).“We’ve got to find a way to get it done,” Brown said. “Can’t get complacent. Got to buy into the details and detail work. We don’t carry luggage. When the week is over, we singularly focus on the week in front of us. We just didn’t get it done. We’ve got to be better.”___AP NFL websites: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFLlast_img read more

New Magazine to board InterCaribbean Airways

first_img Related Items:cacique, inflight magazine, Intercaribbean Airways, trevor sadler Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Turks and Caicos airline, ICA, now flies to Havana Recommended for you Airports Authority commanded to protect South Caicos airport by airline Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 23 Mar 2015 – An inflight magazine is coming for InterCaribbean Airways according to CEO, Trevor Sadler. Just before Summer, the magazine to be called, ‘Cacique’ will be planted in all seat back pockets and will showcase the things to see and do in the six Caribbean countries to which the TCI-based airline flies. “interCaribbean Airways teamed up with global publisher Land and Marine which is a specialty publisher publishing in 56 countries today. With their strength in printing magazines, we look forward to a fruitful relationship in the Caribbean.” Gary Gimson, of UK-based, Land & Marine Publication said ‘Cacique’ will be produced quarterly. The magazine debuts in May. Domestic Airline Companies institute insecticide spraying to ward off Zikalast_img read more

New theory proposed to explain Pioneer probe gravitational anomaly

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Portuguese physicists might have finally solved the decades old mystery of why the Pioneer probes, launched in the early 70’s, haven’t been decelerating from the Sun’s gravitational pull at the rate expected; it seems it might be something as mundane as adding in the tiny forces that occur when minute traces of heat from the plutonium on board the probes bounce off their receiving dishes, creating a counterforce, which in turn, causes the craft to slow; if ever so slightly. Citation: New theory proposed to explain Pioneer probe gravitational anomaly (2011, April 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-theory-probe-gravitational-anomaly.html The Pioneer anomaly, as it’s come to be known, has had physicists scratching their heads ever since an astronomer by the name of John Anderson, working for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, back in 1980, noticed a discrepancy between the slowdown rate projections for the craft and the rates they were actually experiencing, which led to the basic question, how could both probes be slowing down faster than the laws of physics projected? Possible explanations ranged from unknown mechanical issues with both craft, to dark matter pushing back, to possible flaws in the physics theories themselves.But now, Frederico Francisco of the Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Lisbon Portugal and colleagues, as they describe in their paper published in arXiv, seem to have solved the problem using a simple old technology. Suspecting that heat was involved, they started with follow-up work by Anderson in 2002 and Slava Turyshev in 2006, also from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratories, who both showed that heat released from the plutonium onboard the spacecraft could very well explain a slowdown. Unfortunately, both concluded that such heat emissions could not possibly account for the amount of slowdown seen. But this was because neither man thought to consider the impact of heat hitting the backside of the satellite dish (antennae) and then bouncing back. Francisco and his team used a computer modeling technique called Phong shading to show how the flow of heat as it was emitted from the main equipment compartment could emanate outwards, eventually bouncing off the back of the dish, resulting in just enough counterforce to explain the gravitational discrepancy.Case closed, as far as Francisco et al are concerned, but of course this being science, others will have to replicate the results before any sort of consensus can be found. © 2010 PhysOrg.com TPS Enables Study Of Mysterious Pioneer Anomaly More information: Modelling the reflective thermal contribution to the acceleration of the Pioneer spacecraft, arXiv:1103.5222v1 [physics.space-ph] arxiv.org/abs/1103.5222AbstractWe present an improved method to compute the radiative momentum transfer in the Pioneer 10 & 11 spacecraft that takes into account both diffusive and specular reflection. The method allows for more reliable results regarding the thermal acceleration of the deep-space probes, confirming previous findings. A parametric analysis is performed in order to set an upper and lower-bound for the thermal acceleration and its evolution with time. Schematics of the configuration of Lambertian sources used to model the lateral walls of the main equipment compartment. Image credit: arXiv:1103.5222v1 [physics.space-ph] http://arxiv.org/abs/1103.5222 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more