杭州龙凤夜生活

first_imgCorning >> It’s been more than five years since the Corning Cardinals football team beat its neighbor and rival Orland Trojans and Friday night they were due.It took every second of the game, but the Cardinals didn’t disappoint the home crowd, taking 27-25 win on a Junior Gonzalez field goal at time ran out. The team rushed the field and mobbed Gonzalez at midfield as the grandstands roared.“They’ve been really strong but our kids battled hard,” said coach John Studer after the win. “It’s not …last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By DeVaughn Davis, Nathaniel Kinney, Kristy Payne, Dalton Shipley, OSU Animal Science Undergraduate Students, and Brady Campbell, Program Coordinator, OSU Sheep TeamAnother school year has passed and I am happy to say that I have completed my third year of being involved in AS 4004, Small Ruminant Production at The Ohio State University. This year Dr. Liz Parker and myself co-instructed this course and worked diligently to expose our students to every aspect of the small ruminant industry, including extension outreach and producer education. As a part of the course curriculum, students were challenged to compose an Ag-note (educational poster) to highlight a specific topic that is related to sheep or goat production, management, and husbandry. As viewers, you will see these unique postings appear periodically and will be noted in the title as “Ag-note.”For our first Ag-note, OSU students DeVaughn Davis, Nathaniel Kinney, Kristy Payne, and Dalton Shipley share an economic perspective on the comparison of continuous versus management intensive grazing.Grazing systems will vary greatly depending upon several factors including time, labor, and fencing supplies. Thankfully, shepherds have a few options when it comes to different grazes strategies. The simplest grazing system would be continuous grazing. Continuous grazing is where animals are placed in a pasture with a perimeter fence and one water source. Animals are not rotated and continually graze the same land without any type of internal divisions. Continuous grazing is beneficial from the standpoint that it requires low financial inputs, capital costs, and minimal labor. However, this grazing system becomes costly and an issue as some forage species do not have enough time to regrow due to animals grazing them as soon as new growth begins. As a result, pastures will show a reduction in yield per acre, become susceptible to overgrazing, and show an increase in undesirable forages and weeds.On the other hand, shepherds may use a series of rotations where animals are given a specific amount of time on a specific pasture/paddock and then moved to the next area. For those shepherds that are interested in capitalizing on land yield and utilization, one may consider using management intensive grazing. Management intensive grazing describes the intensity of management being placed on your rotation criteria. Rotations in this type of grazing system are based upon forage height, stocking density, forage quality, and parasite status. The benefits of management intensive grazing include increased pasture yields, quality of feed, and improved pasture parasite management. However, this grazing system does not come with out a cost. Management intensive grazing requires an increase in labor and management as well as initial costs for extra fencing and watering supplies needed for each individual paddock.For an economic analysis comparing these two grazing systems, please refer to Ag-note in the link above.Efficient utilization of pasture land is key an all grazing systems. Management intensive grazing may be one solution that can be implemented on-farm in order to maximize pasture utilization. Although rotational grazing requires more time and labor inputs, the forage production generated from this management practice will pay for itself as it will yield a greater amount of forage per acre as well as decrease the need for supplemental feeding, thus decreasing feed costs.To conclude this topic, the Economics group wanted to leave readers with 4 keys that will help lead to grazing success.Keys to Success: Begin grazing pasture when forages are 6-10 inches in height (will vary dependent upon forage species).Do not graze pastures below 3 inches in height.Let paddocks rest and recover for 10-60 days (dependent upon environmental conditions).Learn to adapt to environmental conditions and challenges.Comparison of Continuous vs. Management Intensive Grazinglast_img read more

first_imgRelated Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Analysis#NYT#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img I’d like to ask for a moment of silence to mark the passing of a Web application that had eyes bigger than its stomach. An ambitious little startup called Nsyght gave up the ghost this weekend and with it went some very, very cool features. In the end, this little Twitter and Facebook message-parsing service just couldn’t do what it set out to do, and so it has closed up shop.By some standards, Twitter publishes a whole lot of data, about 1,000 messages per second. Nsyght allowed you to do remarkable things with that river of data: search inside Twitter lists, retrieve your own long-lost messages or filter messages from your friends by media type. Below are three of the ways I used Nsyght every day in my news gathering routine. Maybe someday, someone, somewhere will be able to bite off this many Tweets and return these kinds of dream-features to the world.What Was That Link I Tweeted?One of the features that Nsyght offered was the ability to retrieve your own tweets from way back, months back in the archive, by keyword search. There are very few other ways to do this. Twitter itself won’t let you search your own or other peoples’ archives back very far at all because of the database challenges. Nsyght was my go-to place to do that, and I already miss it. What does it mean that we’re all creating so much data, but so much of it becomes inaccessible even to ourselves just weeks after it’s published? Hunting for PhotosI kept Nsyght open in a browser tab every day while I worked and kept it set to filter all my incoming Twitter and Facebook messages by media type. Specifically, I watched a feed of all the photos my contacts were sharing. This helped me unearth some great tech industry news photos that got turned into short, interesting little blog posts. I sure miss that feature. The hard part isn’t filtering for media type, of course, that probably just requires a good white-list of media-sharing domains to watch for links to. The hard part is eating the Tweets without choking, or missing too many of them.Above: I used Nsyght to filter all recent Twitter messages posted by Facebook staff members for the keyword “Twitter.”What do the Experts Say?I’ve got a news writing workflow that involves pushing this button, pulling that lever, pinging those robots, etc. It’s worked out very well to help me learn quickly about the things I write about, without living in the Silicon Valley myself. These systems are a great democratizer of knowledge.One of my favorite new ones was Nysght’s search inside a Twitter list feature. You could start following a brand new Twitter list with your Twitter account, and Nsyght would take just a few minutes to ping the Twitter API again and again and build an archive of hundreds of the back-logged Tweets the people on that list had posted prior to your discovering it. You could then search those Tweets by keyword!So part of my routine had been to jump over to Tlists or Listorious as soon as I figured out the subject of my next article. I would find an expert-curated list of specialists in any relevant fields and I’d follow those lists on Twitter. Then I’d go and do other research using other tools (like the telephone, or custom search engines) while Nsyght built an archive of that new list I just started following in the background. After a few minutes, I could jump over to Nsyght and quickly filter through the recent history of that list to see what those topical experts had been saying on Twitter about the subject of my article. There are a number of services online today that try to make it easy to use Twitter’s public replies to ask questions of particular topical experts, but sometimes it works a lot better to be able to filter for keywords in their existing public conversations among themselves. It was great! But now it’s gone.Nsyght, when it worked, was an incredible tool for harvesting knowledge from my existing community of curated contacts and their publishing streams. Hopefully, someday, someone, somewhere, will build something that can handle this much data and provide a fast, simple interface to fill needs like the above.Unfortunately, it looks like that’s not going to be Nsyght. As founder Geoffrey McCaleb wrote in his goodbye post this weekend, after the site had been down for the past three weeks:“Ultimately, the site was working in an offline capacity, and still working as good as it was the day we went offline. The problem? It just wasn’t good enough. It wasn’t stable, but more disturbingly it frequently had ‘gaps’ so sometimes users would miss posts from their friends – which is really the whole point of the service. As much as I wanted to restore the service, there’s no room for ‘sorta’ good. You either have a really cool service that truly innovates/changes the game, or you go home. marshall kirkpatrick 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

first_imgDifferencesAir leakage: It’s true that neither insulation is an air barrier. Neither cellulose (even when dense-packed) nor fiberglass meet any technical standard for an air barrier. However, cellulose will slow air flow whereas fiberglass does not.When dense packed into a wall cavity, cellulose prevents most air flow. Even loose-fill cellulose slows some air movement.Flammability: Fiberglass and cellulose have different issues with fire and flame spread. Fiberglass is spun glass; it won’t burn at any normal temperature. Under direct flame, it will simply melt. However, most fiberglass batts are faced with kraft paper which most certainly will burn.Cellulose is ground-up paper. Very early cellulose-style insulation was quite flammable. (I mean, c’mon — it’s paper.) During the ’70s and ’80s, cellulose couldn’t shake a bad reputation stemming from (possibly apocryphal) stories about insulation fires.Modern cellulose is heavily treated (about 15% by volume) with boric acid, borax nitrate or ammonium sulfate. [Editor’s note: see Daniel Lea’s 3/8/2012 comment on this point below.] These chemicals aren’t harmful to people, but are very effective flame retardants and help reduce pest issues. Modern cellulose manufacture has sufficiently high production standards that product quality and flammability are no longer issues of concern.Ease of installation: Anyone can insulate a wall with fiberglass batts. It’s just a matter of cutting around electrical outlets, slapping the batts into the wall cavities and stapling the facing to the studs. Unfortunately, a fast, sloppy installation usually results in voids or imperfections. Proper installation of fiberglass batts is slow, meticulous work (which is why most fiberglass batt installations are fast and sloppy.)Fortunately, it’s harder to do a sloppy job with cellulose, although installing cellulose in a wall requires special equipment like high-powered insulation blowers which are a sight more powerful than the Geo Metro versions you can rent at the Big Box store. Also, unless you like blowing out your finish drywall, more than a little experience is helpful.Embodied energy: Embodied energy is the sum of energy required for a project or material. Fiberglass has a much higher embodied energy than cellulose insulation. Fiberglass is glass that is melted and spun into fibers like cotton candy. There are fiberglass brands which use recycled content but more often they use new raw materials.Most cellulose brands use a high recycled content and the production process (shredding paper and adding fire retardant borates) uses much less energy.Extreme cold: Last, the two types of insulation react very differently in extreme cold. During very cold weather — the type of weather sometimes seen in Minnesota or Maine — heat is quickly stripped from fiberglass insulation, and the R-value of fiberglass insulation drops. Cellulose doesn’t suffer as acutely from this problem. Of course, prices can vary from contractor to contractor, and may vary if you have access to a special deal, but in general, fiberglass batts and cellulose are usually the cheapest insulation options.Ease of Installation: Fiberglass has become the most popular insulation in the world because it is effective (if properly installed) and inexpensive. Contractors and do-it-yourself folks don’t need special training or equipment to install it. (However, inexperienced installers often do a sloppy job of installation, reducing the effectiveness of the insulation job.)When installed in an attic, blown-in cellulose requires about 3 molecules more effort. The job requires an insulation blower and 30 minutes of training from the guy at Lowe’s. (An important note: I am talking about blown-in cellulose here… not damp-spray, netted, or dense-packed cellulose.)R-value: Fiberglass batts and cellulose deliver comparable R-value (between 3.5 and 3.7 per inch). This can vary based on many factors, including settling, wind-washing or outside temperature, but in general the R-values of the two products are similar.Air leakage: Both types of insulation help retain heat, but neither one can act as an air barrier. Both cellulose and fiberglass allow air to pass through and need to be paired with an air barrier. The effective R-value of fiberglass can be particularly affected by air flow.Moisture: Neither insulation is a fan of moisture. Both cellulose and fiberglass can retain large amounts of moisture. Because of their high air permeability both can dry out very quickly.Cellulose and fiberglass are fibrous insulation which can easily trap moisture. If paired with a vapor barrier in a high moisture environment like your basement … it can be problematic.Wind washing: Lastly, when blown onto the floor of an attic with vented soffits, both loose-fill cellulose and fiberglass are susceptible to wind.A strong gust of wind will blow loose insulation all over the attic. With Maine’s stiff sea breezes, I’ve seen several houses whose insulation is blown entirely to one side. Loose-blown insulation requires properly sealed and blocked eaves to prevent wind washing. Installing Fiberglass RightHow to Install Cellulose InsulationBorrowing a Cellulose Blower From a Big Box StoreGBA Encyclopedia: Insulation ChoicesBlown Insulation for Attics: Fiberglass vs. CelluloseUnderstanding R-Value SimilaritiesCost: First off, both cellulose and fiberglass are inexpensive. Among the wide range of available insulation materials — including XPS foam board, EPS, polyisocyanurate, rock wool, and spray foam — cellulose and fiberglass are, inch for inch and square foot for square foot, the least expensive. The two least expensive and most commonly used residential insulation are fiberglass and cellulose. Granted, fiberglass is about 50 times more common — but a distant second is still second.Unless the homeowner opts for spray foam, the insulation choice usually comes down to fiberglass vs. cellulose. So what are the advantages and disadvantages of each one? How are they similar and how are they different?At first blush, itchy pink fiberglass and fluffy gray cellulose seems quite different. But the two types of insulation wouldn’t be competing for the same share of the housing insulation market if they weren’t in many ways alike.center_img BLOGS BY ERIC NORTH How to Insulate and Air-Seal Pull-Down Attic StairsHow to Insulate and Air Seal an Attic HatchCan Switching to a Dual-Flush Toilet Save Heat?Essential Energy-Audit EquipmentThe Journal of Poor HomebuildingCape Cod Style Homes Are Difficult to Heat RELATED ARTICLES Which insulation should you choose?So should you insulate with cellulose or fiberglass? Well, I’ve included a photo showing insulation being installed at my house. (Click Image 2 below to see the photo.)We dense-packed the wall cavities with cellulose. I choose cellulose because of the better air sealing, and comparable R-value for the same price. Should you insulate with cellulose or fiberglass? It depends on the project at hand.last_img read more