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first_imgOn Saturday, September 9th, an impressive crew of musicians converged on the Mountain Theater in Marin County, CA’s Mount Tamalpais State Park for the 2018 edition of Sound Summit: A Benefit For The Mountain. This year, jazz-funk icon Herbie Hancock led an artist roster including Grace Potter, Nikki Lane, and Con Brio. In addition, the event saw Bob Weir reunite with his former RatDog rhythm section (drummer Jay Lane and bassist Robin Sylvester) as Bobby & The Chew Toys.With Weir serving as the event’s special guest, the Grateful Dead guitarist had some memorable sit-ins. In addition to joining Hancock for a jam on his Head Hunters classic, “Chameleon“, Weir sat in on Grace Potter’s set for a rendition of the Dead’s outlaw ballad, “Friend of the Devil”. With Potter on acoustic and Weir on an electric guitar, the two traded off vocal duties on verses before coming back together on the chorus with some breezy harmonies. Grace Potter ended the collaboration by hollering, “Give it up for your hometown boy, Mr. Bobby Weir!”You can watch full fan-shot footage of Bob Weir’s sit-in with Grace Potter at Sound Summit 2018 below:Grace Potter w/ Bob Weir – “Friend Of The Devil”[Video: Deadheadland Films]Sound Summit is building a reputation as a breeding ground for incredible collaborations. Last year, Weir sat in with Jim James at the event. Later in the evening, both Weir and James joined in with Phil Lesh & Friends. We can’t wait to see what magic Sound Summit cooks up for next year.Sound Summit is presented by Roots & Branches Conservancy, a group dedicated to raising funds for natural resource protection and conservation of Mount Tamalpais State Park and the surrounding areas. For more information or to find out how to donate, head to the group’s website.Bob Weir has a busy fall schedule on the books, including an upcoming Across The Great Divide benefit, the inaugural Sweetwater In The Sun event, and a 22-date tour with Weir’s newest project, Bob Weir and Wolf Bros, a trio featuring Jay Lane on drums and Don Was on bass.You can check out a full list of the upcoming Bob Weir and Wolf Bros dates below. For more information on upcoming dates and tickets, head to Bobby’s website.Bob Weir and Wolf Bros Upcoming Tour Dates10/16 – Reno, NV – Grand Sierra Resort and Casino10/18 – Los Angeles, CA – The Theatre at Ace Hotel10/20 – Santa Barbara, CA – Arlington Theatre10/22 – Portland, OR – Keller Auditorium10/23 – Seattle, WA – Moore Theatre10/24 – Missoula, MT – Wilma Theatre10/26 – Salt Lake City, UT – Eccles Theater10/27 – Albuquerque, NM – Kiva Auditorium at the Albuquerque Convention Center10/29 – Denver, CO – Paramount Theatre10/31 – Chicago, IL – The Chicago Theatre11/1 – Chicago, IL – The Chicago Theatre11/5 – Nashville, TN – Ryman Auditorium11/6 – Louisville, KY – Palace Theatre11/8 – Syracuse, NY – Landmark Theatre11/9 – Port Chester, NY – Capitol Theatre11/10 – Port Chester, NY – Capitol Theatre11/12 – Washington, DC – Warner Theatre11/13 – Philadelphia, PA – The Fillmore11/15 – Boston, MA – Boch Center Wang Theatre11/16 – Boston, MA – Boch Center Wang Theatre11/18 – New York, NY – Beacon Theatre11/19 – New York, NY – Beacon TheatreView All Tour Dates[H/T jambands.com]last_img read more

first_imgAlex Brightman (Photos: Emilio Madrid-Kuser, Matthew Murphy, Bruce Glikas) Related Shows View Comments In the corporate world, employees leaving a job are often asked to sit through an exit interview with HR about their time at the company. That concept doesn’t exist for Broadway performers, but we love checking in with stars as they finish up a successful run. Alex Brightman originated the role of Dewey Finn in Broadway’s School of Rock and garnered a Tony nomination for his performance. Brightman will leave his pint-sized bandmates at the Winter Garden Theatre on November 6. In his Broadway.com Exit Interview, Brightman shares why he’s leaving, what he’ll miss and how the role has changed him.How did you feel when you first got this job?This was the phone call that you don’t even dream about. I stood on 23rd Street and Seventh Avenue. The phone to my ear. My eyes wide and beginning to water. I have had great successes over my short career, but this was just something that didn’t seem tangible until it did. There are billions of people in the world and only one of them, in that moment, gets to star in Andrew Lloyd Webber’s brand new Broadway musical. It’s still, to this day, indescribable. How do you feel now that you’re leaving?As I write this, I have 13 performances left. We have done almost 400 performances, not including the workshop performances, and this has been a gigantic part of my life. My heart is full of School of Rock, and it will continue to be full for a long time because of it. As the end of this road comes closer, I feel proud and happy. I don’t feel sad to be leaving. I’m thrilled to move on, knowing that I have done everything I could have ever done with this experience. On my final night in the show, there will be tears and frivolity and laughter. I can’t wait to pass the torch to the new class. They’re going to have a blast.What are three words you would use to describe your experience?Rip-roaring. Hard-won. Transformative.What was the easiest thing about this job?Showing up every day knowing that I was going to get to play pretend with my friends in one of the best playgrounds I have ever had the pleasure to help build.What was the hardest thing?Maintenance! Before this show, I was pretty sure that I was invincible, but I am thrilled to have been humbled by this monster of a role. This show/role is a full-time job. I wake up thinking about my voice and body. I go to sleep thinking about my voice and body. I am ready to be a little less selfish and give myself a bit of a break. The other hardest thing was saying goodbye to the wonderful young performers who graduated from the show. I would write them a little speech/poem/etc. after curtain call, and that never got easier. They are wonderful people and I will miss them dearly.What was the highlight of your time at this job?The one true highlight (and trust me, there are thousands) for me was simply being able to create a performance that was supremely me. I have never had so much encouragement to play and think and invent in the exact way I would want to play and think and invent. The other highlight I should mention was going to and performing at the Tony Awards. I had never been before, and it was quite the experience that I will never forget.What skills do you think are required for future job applicants?Each Dewey is going to be different. That’s the beauty of the role. But the prerequisites are this in no particular order: stamina, ethics, absurdity, diligence, health and the willingness to leave part of yourself on stage every single night.What advice would you give to future employees in your job position?Bring your baggage in the door with you. This is a role that requires raw-nerve feelings and smash-cut emotions. If I have a bad day, I bring some of it to my performance that evening. Passion swings both ways and Dewey has the opportunity to access both nightly. My other piece of advice is to really get to know the young performers. The show hinges on the relationship between Dewey and the students. It’s important to realize that these “kids” are people. They are interesting human beings with amazing stories and backgrounds. It’s vital to have a friendship with them. It shows on stage.How do you think you’ve grown?Growing is incremental and relative. Through this experience, I have learned how to take care of myself better than ever. And I mean that on all levels. I have always been a “yes” man. I worried that the pressure and weight of this role would make me less of one. But I am proud to say that I have grown into someone who knows his limits. I am still a “yes” man. But I am also a smarter “yes” man. And having the great opportunity to carry and lead a show has given me the tools to do it again and again and again. I’m up for that task, and now I know that with confidence.Why are you leaving?I am leaving because I want a rich and varied career, and I can only do that if I continue to be artistically nomadic. I’m working on a ton of new things (writing, acting, etc.) and I can’t wait to devote some more attention to those projects. It’s important to risk things. I love not knowing what’s in front of me.What will you miss the most? I will miss it all. This has been the most fun I have had in any show I have ever done…ever. I will miss the young performers. They make me better. I will miss my friends. They make me better. I will miss the audiences. They make me better. I will miss this experience. It has enlightened me. And it has made me better.center_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 20, 2019 School of Rock – The Musicallast_img read more

first_imgThis week at the Regent Theater: “Walking with Dinosaurs.” (Movie trailer is below). When: Friday 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 2 and 7 p.m. Rotten Tomatoes rating (movie critics collective approval ratings): 25%. Audience review: 42% approval.Movies ahead at Regent Theater: Movie Synopsis: For the first time in movie history, audiences will truly see and feel what it was like when dinosaurs ruled the Earth. WALKING WITH DINOSAURS is the ultimate immersive, big screen adventure for families. Meet dinosaurs more real than you’ve ever seen as you take off on a thrilling prehistoric adventure, where Patchi, an underdog dinosaur, triumphs against all odds to become a hero for the ages. (c) Fox Rated: P.G. Time: 1 hour 20 minutes. Jan. 31 – Lone SurvivorFeb. 7 – Nut Job.Feb. 14 – Ride Along Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more