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first_imgFamily and Consumer Sciences (FACS) Agent Ines Beltran, of University of Georgia Cooperative Extension in Gwinnett County, recently combined two of her favorite things — teaching people how to improve their health and visiting her home country of Colombia.As a FACS agent, Beltran teaches people how to become, and stay, healthier. Last January, she was awarded first place in the UGA Extension Winter Conference poster presentation competition for her work to increase the number of Gwinnett County women who get screened for cancer and change their behavior to help prevent cancer. The project was a collaboration with FACS agents from several counties across Georgia.Shortly thereafter, Beltran’s sister Adriana Beltran, a researcher at the University Corporation God’s Minute (UCGM) in Bogotá, Colombia, met with her colleagues to discuss the curriculum of the university’s preventive medicine programs. The university’s office of virtual and remote programs was planning a conference and needed experts to present.“We were planning the ‘cycle of conferences’ in which well-known panelists of national and international importance participate with different topics of interest for our students,” said Margarita Palma, director of the university’s Occupational Health Administration program. “We needed someone to present on the issue of nutrition and aging in a healthy way, so when we received Ines’ vitae, we proceeded to contact her.”  Before accepting the invitation, Beltran got approval from her district head, Sheldon Hammond, who wholeheartedly supported the venture.“Ines works in brain health, and by making an international presentation, not only is she raising awareness, she’s also bringing scientific, academic and outreach-minded individuals to the table to effect real change,” said Kisha Faulk, UGA Extension FACS program coordinator for the Northwest District. “Many of us in Family and Consumer Sciences often teach about health and well-being, but we’re usually focusing in on the body and not the mind. As professionals, we know that brain health and the effects of aging on the brain, such as Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, can significantly affect the whole family.”Beltran then used prize money from her award-winning poster to help pay for her plane ticket to Colombia. She spent the week of June 15 teaching UGA Extension’s Healthy Brain program, which she developed, to more than 220 Colombian occupational health and psychology students and staff in UCGM’s distance learning division.The number of students initially overwhelmed Beltran, who is accustomed to teaching Gwinnett County residents in small groups. But she soon realized that although there were more students, they were just as eager to learn as her clients back home in the U.S., and these students would soon graduate, become professionals and apply the information she taught them in their own careers.Beltran taught the Healthy Brain program, which includes a recipe preparation demonstration and tasting session designed to encourage participants to add more fish to their diets. During the class, participants use a risk calculator to assess their lifestyle and future potential for keeping their brain healthy. Beltran explains the differences between dementia and Alzheimer’s and helps the students determine their own risk factors through the risk calculator handout.“Each student is given a drawing of the brain divided in nine different areas. Each area identifies the risk factors for dementia,” Beltran said. “Participants color in the areas for which they respond ‘YES’ to the associated risk factors.”If most of the areas are colored in, the participant sees that they may be at increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease and poor brain health as they age, she said.“This interactive activity includes an explanation of the life behaviors that may lower their risk for dementia,” she said.At the end of the class, data is collected from each participant using a specific evaluation tool designed to determine their knowledge before and after the lesson.“They loved the program, which is very interactive,” said Beltran who presented the information in Spanish. “I found the handouts in Spanish through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and we saw great results through the students’ evaluations. I also created a Spanish version of the recipe handout to use during the program. They received all the information, and they learned something, too.” The Colombian university’s distance education program would like Beltran to teach more programs virtually from Georgia.“It is valuable to (UCGM) to raise its mobility indicators of international experts that allow us to carry out research projects related to the area of nutrition and aging healthy,” Palma said. “Our mode of study (distance and virtual), allows us to carry out activities with teachers from other countries without them moving physically to our institution.”Although Beltran would love to return to Colombia and see her elderly father, presenting the classes virtually via the Internet is a much more efficient method, and she won’t have to tackle the “awful” traffic in Colombia.(Beltran received two first places poster awards at the State FACS conference in August. On Sept. 2, she received the Epsilon Sigma Phi Alpha Beta Chapter’s International Service Award for her work in Colombia.)last_img read more

first_img‘Four Pinocchios’ for President’s Claim of a Turnaround in West Virginia FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Washington Post:Even though Trump claims he has “turned West Virginia around,” the trends aren’t expected to last. The Bureau of Business and Economic Research at West Virginia University estimated the state’s GDP growth to average 1.0 percent per year over the next five years and employment to grow 0.7 percent — well below national projections.Additionally, the coal industry still has a way to go to recover from its losses. In 2008, the state produced nearly 158 million short tons of coal, and by 2016, that number had plummeted to 80 million, according to a report by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research.John Deskins, co-author of the report and director of the bureau, cautioned that while increased coal production is projected to remain stable, the state still has a long road to economic recovery.“West Virginia has no short-term solution for its economic problems,” Deskins said. “We need industrial diversification and investment in human capital. But with the state’s poor education system and really bad drug epidemic, the human capital gains are a major challenge.”Trump takes credit for West Virginia’s economic gains, but it’s undeserved. For one, when the first quarter ended on March 31, 2017, Trump was just two months into his presidency. While he was quick to do away with several regulations on energy production, many of the new policies have yet to take effect. The state’s recent growth is due to increased mining production and a rise in prices for coal and natural gas.Taking credit for economic advances where no credit is due seems to be a habit for Trump. He should be more careful not to overstate the effect of his administration’s policies when praising economic gains across the country.  For trying to capitalize on the hard work of West Virginians, Trump earns Four Pinocchios.More: President Trump’s claim that he ‘turned West Virginia around’ by cutting regulations on mininglast_img read more

first_imgThe credit union community will be out in force for the annual Credit Union Cherry Blossom Ten-Mile Run Sunday, which raises funds for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals.CUNA staff will join other credit union volunteers helping the race run without a hitch, and more than 165 members of Congress have signed on to serve as honorary race chairs.More than 15,000 runners are expected to participate in the race. This is the 14th year credit unions have sponsored the event. Credit Union Miracle Day , a collaboration of more than 100 credit unions, partners and credit union service organizations will present a $525,852 donation on race day.Runners will choose between the 10-mile run or a 5K run/walk, and children ages 5 to 12 can participate in a half-mile run. Runners in the 10-mile run will have a chance at the largest-ever purse for the event: $80,500.American runners will run in pursuit of a $25,000 purse, with a $10,000 bonus available to anyone who breaks the men’s or women’s record. Greg Myers set the men’s record in 1983 with a time of 46 minutes, 13 seconds, and Janet Bawcom set the women’s record last year with a time of 52 minutes, 12 seconds. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Interactive Spanish Class sings at Washington Elementary.by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The Internet has been accused of separating people from one another. But sometimes it brings people together.An Interactive Distance Learning Spanish Class recently went Christmas caroling at several locations in Wellington. The class is taught by Virginia Metzinger, a South Haven teacher, and Spanish is taught over interactive distance learning or commonly called videoconferencing. Students were from Central-Burden, Udall, Douglass, Hamilton, Altoona and Cedar Vale. The students had never seen one another except through video conferencing. But earlier this month they all came together and spread some Christmas cheer.On Dec. 5, the Spanish Class met at the parking lot and met each other for the first time. The group of 46 students then sang several Christmas songs in Spanish while visiting the Golden Living Center, Sterling House, Lincoln and Washington Elementary. They then all finished up at Fabiola’s Restaurant to sing and eat.last_img read more