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first_img JustGiving will once again provide the fundraising platform for next year’s Brighton Marathon Weekend, after the contract went to Virgin Money Giving in 2018.The Brighton Marathon Weekend launched in 2010 and consists of a series of events including a full marathon, children’s run, a 10km race and a cycling event. This year’s event, which took place last weekend, is aiming to raise in excess of £6 million, with 18,000 participants with over 150,000 spectators supporting their family and friends. Entry for the 2020 event opens this week.JustGiving previously worked with the event between 2012 and 2017.The announcement follows JustGiving’s recent changes to its fee model, which has seen it drop its platform fees for charities, giving users the option to give a voluntary donation to cover the cost of running the platform instead. Commenting, Keith Williams, General Manager and Head of UK at JustGiving said:“It’s fantastic news that Brighton Marathon have returned to JustGiving and chosen us as their preferred fundraising partner. We’re thrilled to be working with the Grounded Events team again and helping their participants to raise even more money for great causes in 2020 and beyond.“Brighton Marathon is known for being a destination event creating life changing experiences for people and making a big “for good” impact in the world whilst doing it, which makes this partnership even more aligned in combined missions. Brighton Marathon was also my first ever full marathon in 2011, so working together again as partners makes this very special indeed.”Tom Naylor, Director of Brighton Marathon Weekend said: Advertisement  291 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14  290 total views,  2 views today Melanie May | 17 April 2019 | News JustGiving to be exclusive fundraising partner for 2020 Brighton Marathon Weekend Tagged with: fundraising events Justgiving “We’re so excited to be partnering with JustGiving again for the 2020 Brighton Marathon Weekend – our event participants deserve the best fundraising experience and JustGiving is the platform to deliver this. Brighton Marathon’s goal is to continue to innovate and break fundraising records, working with the JustGiving team will help us achieve this.“The recent fee changes to JustGiving’s platform mean that our fundraisers are able to raise even more money for charities and good causes – this was an important factor in driving us to choose JustGiving to support next year’s event.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

first_imgSen. Braun (center) with staff from The Reservation.Batesville and Milan, IN — Senator Mike Braun stopped in Batesville and Milan on Tuesday as part of his yearly tour to visit all 92 counties in Indiana to listen to Hoosiers about his work for them in the Senate.Senator Braun sat down with Batesville Superintendent Paul Ketcham and State Senator Jean Leising to discuss Batesville Community School Corporation’s (BCSC) plan to safely reopen to students and how important it is for kids to get back to school safely this fall.Senator Mike Braun’s stop in Milan on Tuesday was to visit The Reservation Restaurant to discuss how coronavirus restrictions have affected the community restaurant industry, how Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans helped the business stay afloat during the pandemic, and the measures they are taking to have a safe and healthy reopening. Paul Ketcham, Sen. Braun, and State Sen. Jean Leising at the BCSC office.last_img read more

first_imgWhen Diaz returned, he reached inside the victim’s car with the gun and continued to argue with him.At that point, the victim drove off, as Diaz fired at the car, hitting its tire.Diaz was detained at the scene and was later taken to the Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center.He is facing charges of aggravated assault with a firearm, occupied vehicle burglary with a firearm and discharging a firearm in public. The victim was driving by the area, when he lowered his window and began talking to Diaz.Officials say the person then proceeded to drive away, but turned around and returned a few moments later.The victim and Diaz began arguing, at which point Diaz obtained a pistol from his car, police say.BREAKING: Gun fired during argument near Trump appearance in Doral https://t.co/CZapB5NF8h— WPLG Local 10 News (@WPLGLocal10) July 10, 2020 A 73-year-old man was arrested late Friday, after he opened fire during President Trump’s visit to the U.S. Southern Command, according to Doral Police.Police say Miami resident Luis Orlando Diaz was part of a group of people who gathered near NW 87th Avenue and 29th Street for the president’s visit.last_img read more

first_imgBLUE HILL — As his players and assistant coaches gathered at halftime, Dwayne Carter saw a chance for his team to put its regular season opener out of reach.No, Carter’s George Stevens Academy boys’ basketball team hadn’t been the definition of consistent during the first half of Saturday’s game against Lee Academy, which had limited the Eagles to just six points in the second quarter. Still, the GSA head coach knew his team could make a Lee comeback difficult with a big second-half run, and he had an ideal time frame in mind.“I told them, ‘The first three minutes, we’re going all out,’” Carter said. “We still had a lot of energy, and that’s what I wanted them to do.”When the second half began, the Eagles gave their head coach exactly what he wanted; in just 3 minutes, 10 seconds, GSA scored 18 points to turn a surmountable lead into a commanding one en route to a 69-42 victory in Blue Hill.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textGSA (1-0) took an early lead through Milos Sujica, whose two 3-pointers highlighted a strong offensive stretch for the home team early in the game. The Eagles then rode that momentum to a 24-point first quarter and took a nine-point lead into the second.GSA’s Milos Sujica spots up to shoot against Lee Academy’s Willie Hsu during the first half of a high school boys’ basketball game Dec. 7 in Blue Hill. Sujica, an exchange student from Serbia, gave the Eagles an early lead with a pair of 3-pointers. He finished the game with 14 points. ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTO BY MIKE MANDELLGSA’s defense held Lee Academy to seven points in the second quarter, but the Eagles failed to pull away as Sujica and Gadsby began dealing with foul trouble. With those two on the bench, the visiting Pandas stayed within striking distance and trailed just 30-22 as the two teams left the floor for halftime.“In the second quarter, we just didn’t execute very well, and with a young team, we’re going to have those ups and downs a little bit,” Carter said. “We missed a lot of the shots we took inside because we were too low under the basket, and that’s a sign for us that we have to work on positioning better.”Yet with GSA’s full starting lineup returning to the floor in the second half, the Eagles extended the lead to 20 points in the blink of an eye amidst their three-minute offensive onslaught. With Gadsby, Mattson, Sujica, Michael Moon and Teague Smallidge contributing on offense, the Eagles scored one basket after another while keeping the Lee Academy offense in check en route to a season-opening win.Mattson finished with 21 points for the Eagles, and Sujica (14 points), Gadbsy (11 points) and Moon (10) joined him in double figures. Teague Smallidge (seven points), Austin Snow (three points) and Dexter Brown (two) rounded out the rest of the scoring.“I would say we scored pretty evenly,” Mattson said. “We spread the ball around, and everyone was able to step up and do something when we needed it.”Although Mattson led the team in scoring, Sujica, a 6-foot-3 exchange student from Serbia, had his share of moments in the spotlight. Between his early 3-pointers, full-court passes and overall tenacity on both ends of the floor, Sujica provided plenty for a GSA team Carter says is looking to find a “new identity” after graduating three key seniors and losing forward Andrew Szwez, who transferred to Bangor.“He’s very smart and really sees the game,” Carter said. “Even though he’s just joining us, it seems like he’s played with us for a long time. He brings a new dimension, which we really needed.”GSA’s Caden Mattson passes to teammate Michael Moon during the first half of a high school boys’ basketball game against Lee Academy on Dec. 7 in Blue Hill. Mattson had a game-high 21 points in the win. ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTO BY MIKE MANDELLPlaying in front of a packed gymnasium in Blue Hill was a new experience for Sujica, whose last name is pronounced “Shoe-YEET-za.” Although he had appeared for GSA in preseason action, a loud, white-out crowd set the stage for an atmosphere that wowed the senior in his first regular season game.“It was so much fun,” Sujica said. “The crowd was great; I’ve never experienced anything like that before. I’m excited to get to play more games.”In addition to praising Sujica and Mattson, Carter was also pleased with Gadsby, who made his first career start for the Eagles. After sitting out the entire second quarter, Gadsby came out refreshed in the second half as he highlighted GSA’s three-minute run with a string of four consecutive baskets.GSA’s struggles were primarily limited to the second quarter as the early foul calls against Gadsby and Sujica resulted in both players sitting out the final minutes of the half. Yet that stretch of did provide a silver lining for the Eagles, who got to see some of their inexperienced bench players play meaningful minutes in a game situation.“We’re trying to develop our bench because they’re young and have never played varsity,” Carter said. “It was a good experience for them, but with Gadsby and Milos out, we were down two big scorers. … That’s probably why we didn’t score so much in the second quarter.”Yet even with one of their youngest squads in years, the expectations of hardware and playoff glory haven’t changed at GSA, which has now gone 83-6 since the start of the 2015-16 season. The Eagles will get a chance to add another tally to that win total when they play on the road against Deer Isle-Stonington (0-0) at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 10.“It’s always our goal to compete for a championship and to go as far as we can,” Mattson said. “Hopefully, we can come home with some gold.” MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020 Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all) Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020center_img Bio Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at [email protected] Latest Postslast_img read more

first_imgJake McNichol, a spokesman for the state EDA, said that to date, the authority has approved close to $3.2 million grants for 942 businesses through the initial $5 million Small Business Emergency Assistance Grant Program and distributed some $3 million to 892 of those businesses. In addition, it has approved another $1 million and distributed most of that to small businesses in Atlantic County with funding from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority. The other bill (A-3959) would create a new no-interest loan program to small hospitality businesses impacted by the pandemic. To qualify, a business could have no more than $2 million in annual revenue if open for more than a year, or less than $1 million in annual revenue if open for a shorter time. Loans could be used to cover immediate, unavoidable expenses, with payments deferred for the first nine months after the start date. Story reprinted with permission from NJ Spotlight. Visit NJSpotlight.com for more statewide news updates. In addition to allowing bars and brewers to deliver up to 16-ounce mixed drinks in a sealed container to residents, the Assembly Appropriations Committee voted to create two loan programs for small bars, restaurants and craft alcohol producers, among the numerous businesses that have been struggling through the seven-week shutdown due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Legislators also backexpanding and creatingnew loans for small bars,restaurants, craft alcoholproducers Alcohol takeout, delivery allowed for six months A bill (A-3966) sponsored by Assemblyman John Burzichelli (D-Gloucester), who chairs the committee, seeks to codify the sale of beverages made by the state’s brewers, wineries, cideries, and distilleries and go a bit further. It would permit any business with a retail consumption license or distillery to sell mixed drinks in pint containers and other alcoholic beverages in containers of any size for takeout or delivery, with that permission extended for six months after the end of the current required closure of these businesses. Since Gov. Phil Murphy began shutting down businesses on March 16, including all bars and restaurants except for takeout orders, the state has made exceptions for alcohol. For instance, when he closed virtually all businesses on March 21, Murphy classified liquor stores as an “essential business,” allowing them to remain open. The governor also allowed for takeout and delivery of beer from the dozens of craft breweries around the state. More seriously, the bill would exempt from the state’s alcohol excise tax of $5.50 per gallon any alcohol used by distilleries to make hand sanitizer. Several have switched production to help compensate for the shortage of sanitizer, often donating it to first responders. By Colleen O’Dea – NJ Spotlight “The NJEDA’s perfor- mance, in my opinion, has been very disappointing to date,” said Assemblyman Brian Bergen (R-Morris). “I would just like to see us as a body, as a Legislature, as a committee, to put some pressure on the EDA … to deliver to these small businesses in need in a time of crisis and put the money in their hands and put the money in their hands now and not delay these programs any further.” Webber and other Republican members of the committee also supported two bills that would open additional no-or low-in-terest loan programs for craft brewers and those in the hospitality industry, although they complained that the state Economic Development Authority (EDA), which would provide these loans, has not been moving fast enough to give out money under existing programs. “I think that’s the least we can do for very civic-minded small business owners who are doing their part to try to keep people safe,” said Assemblyman Jay Webber (R-Morris), who voted for the bill. No-or low-interest loans for hospitality business Virtually all of the bills the state Legislature has passed since it stopped meeting in person in the State House due to concerns over the virus were done as emergency measures. Legislative leaders had said they wanted to resume the deliberative process that happens in committees. While Monday’s hearing was quick, there was at least some limited input from the public and lobbyists on a few of the measures and some of the bills, which had been recently introduced, were amended. center_img The article originally appeared in the May 7th – May 13th, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. Monday marked the first legislative committee hearing ever to take place remotely, via teleconference. The committee considered eight bills dealing with issues related to the pandemic, all of which passed without opposition and only a few hiccups due to the technology. EDA is still analyzing3,500 loan applications ithas received requestingmore than $250 millionfrom the Small BusinessEmergency AssistanceLoan Program and plansto distribute that money assoon as possible. “Due to the nature of the loan program, the review is more complex and will take longer to complete than for the grant program,” McNichol said. “The loan program review requires financial analysis to determine the ability to repay the loan under the program eligibility and terms. We are committed to providing businesses with much needed support while completing a thorough review that upholds our commitments to fiscal responsibility and accountability.” Helping small alcoholproducers One of the two new loan programs the committee approved in A-3965 would expand an existing EDA loan program to small alcoholic beverage producers those with no more than 10 employees for operating expenses during a state of emergency. Currently, vineyards and wineries are eligible but not other small craft brewers or distillers. These loans would carry an interest rate of up to three percentage points above the prime rate. This permission is needed because the state has strict laws about who can sell alcohol and how it is sold. Assemblyman Raj Mukherji (D-Hudson), sponsor of the bill, said it is important to assist restaurants and hotels that have been “devastated” by the pandemic and the current limitations on their operations. A 2018 article by Total Food Service reported that the state had, at the time, more than 27,000 restaurants and 1,130 hotels employing more than 400,000. “If we want our vibrant hospitality industry and its many employees to make it through this crisis, we must give these small businesses the tools they need to weather the pandemic until we can safely come together to once again enjoy all they have to offer,” he said. The measures still need approval by the full Assembly and Senate before being sent to Murphy for his consideration. New Jerseyans who have been missing that signature martini, sangria or other cocktail could soon be able to not only get spirits with their takeout order, but even have drinks delivered under one of three bills an Assembly committee cleared Monday that are aimed at helping the state’s hospitality industry. It was the last bill the committee considered, prompting Burzichelli to joke, “In the motion picture business, the last shot of the day is called the martini shot. This is the martini bill. How appropriate it is that it involves cocktails.” last_img read more

first_imgBy Timothy Schafer, The Nelson Daily The future of Morning Mountain may lie in the hands of the Nelson Cycling Club. The Regional District of Central Kootenay holds tenure on the controlled recreation area on the Crown land that used to be the Morning Mountain (Blewett) Ski Hill — and still owns property at the base of the former ski hill — but may be looking to hand that tenure over to the city’s cycling club. Community Services general manager for the RDCK, Joe Chirico, said the land used for the hill hasn’t been utilized for skiing for many years. As a result, they have been having “issues” with people trespassing on the property and they have been looking to find someone who would actively manage it. That someone could be the Nelson Cycling Club, Chirico said. “The cycling club has expressed an interest in being on the property for recreational purposes,” he said. “Lots of the trails in the Giveout Creek area would finish on the Morning Mountain property.” Over the last few years, the cycling club has held their annual fall mountain bike event — the Fat Tire Festival — on Morning Mountain, as well as extensively used the mountain biking trails above the hill in the Giveout Creek area. “They have shown interest as an active group to mange the property, … so we are looking to formalize an agreement with them,” he said. “It’s in the works but not near completion.” A meeting amongst Area E director Ramona Faust, Area F director Ron Mickel, Chirico and the RDCK’s regional park planner to discuss the options for dispensing and allocating the ski hill funds and signage is the next step in the process. [email protected]last_img read more