南京夜生活

OSU junior defender Niall Logue (5) prepares to kick the ball while OSU sophomore midfielder Abdi Mohamed (26) follows during the Buckeyes game against Valparaiso on Sept. 21 at the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. The Buckeyes won 4-1. Credit: Janaya Greene | For The LanternThe Ohio State men’s soccer team looked to continue its elevated play as of late, matching up against No. 13 Louisville on Tuesday night.The Buckeyes luck would run out, however, as the Scarlet and Gray were ultimately outplayed in a 2-1 contest against the Cardinals.Despite facing a 19-3 deficit in shots in the game, OSU was able to get on the board first.In the 32nd minute, senior defender Austin Bergstrom had a throw-in that found sophomore midfielder Abdi Mohamed on the right side of the net. Mohamed got his foot on the ball and redirected it back across the net to the left side. Senior forward Christian Soldat blasted the ball past a diving keeper to give the Buckeyes a 1-0 lead.Soldat’s first goal of the season would be the only score of the opening period for either team.The Cardinals came out in the second half with a much more aggressive game plan, and they were rewarded accordingly for their efforts.In the 51st minute, Louisville senior midfielder Daniel Johnson hit junior forward Mohamed Thiaw with a cross. Thiaw put the ball inside the far left post from six yards out, giving Louisville the early second-half equalizer.It was Thiaw’s 10th goal this season.Later in the period, in the 65th minute, the Cardinals would take the lead.Freshman midfielder Cherif Dieye snuck a ball through a host of defenders from 20 yards out that got just inside the left post to give Louisville its first lead of the game, a 2-1 advantage that would end up as the final.Despite the losing effort, OSU redshirt freshman goalkeeper Parker Siegfried had an impressive night in net. He had his hands full all game, registering a season high nine saves.The Buckeyes will have their sights set on their match this Friday against Michigan, one of their last two Big Ten matchups of the season. read more

Screening the journey

first_imgThe Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA) Film Circle screens two films a month on the second and fourth Friday. This friday IGNCA screened the film Ustad Asad Ali Khan – A Portrait, directed by Renuka George.The 70 minutes film revolves around Asad Ali Khan Khan (1937-2011), the eminent instrumentalist of Jaipur Beenkar gharana. He was one of the very few musicians to practice rudravina, an instrument now almost extinct.The documentary shares his journey that starts from Rampur, where his father was a court musician, to New Delhi where he lived until his death in June 2011. He shares with the complexities of practicing this rare instrument. A glimpse of what life must have been like in the court days, and how the artistes of that generation dedicated themselves to their art was shown.last_img read more

first_img Listen Now 6 min read This story originally appeared on Reuters Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. Britain’s tech startup scene was having a bumper year in terms of new company creation, fresh funding and acquisitions by global tech players before voters decided to leave the European Union in Thursday’s referendum.Now high-profile companies are threatening to pull out or slow down plans to enter the U.K. market, international employees are second-guessing their immigration standing and investors could cut new funding that is the lifeblood of young tech firms.Market researchers are predicting a sharp slowdown in U.K. technology and advertising spending and the longer-term threat that sizeable portions of these budgets will move to the continent.”Nothing’s changed yet but everything’s changed,” said Taavet Hinrikus, the Estonian CEO and co-founder of cross-border money service Transferwise, which is based in London.London has become a magnet for tech entrepreneurs looking to do business in the European Union and a global launch pad for firms aiming to compete with U.S. and Asian web giants. Half the founders of London’s top tech startups come from outside Britain.One-third of recent European investments by venture capitalists, who are often drawn to tech startups, were made in Britain. In the first quarter, U.K. firms drew in $1.3 billion (984 million pounds) in funding, while the rest of Europe took $2.2 billion, according to research firm CBInsights.”The two main benefits of being part of the EU are access to talent because of the free movement of labor and the fact that you can ‘passport’ regulation so if you’re regulated in the U.K., you’re regulated across the EU,” said Hinrikus.”We don’t know what’s going to happen with either of those.”The Transferwise CEO now says “it’s too early to say” what the company may do but said before the referendum that his company could scale back further investment in London and consider moving its headquarters if Britain voted to leave the EU. Body blowsNumber26, a Berlin-based startup offering internet banking services over smartphones in eight European countries, is now reconsidering its planned entry into the U.K. market.”We are probably going to consider other markets first,” said co-founder and chief executive Valentin Stalf, citing separate bank licensing requirements likely to be required once outside the EU. “The U.K. market suddenly became a much more expensive proposition.”Detached from the EU, London could lose some key advantages: its status as a world financial center, European talent and the uniformity of regulations that allowed London-based companies to cater to the European market.Its international employee base may leave the city amid uncertainty about future immigration laws, creating shortages in retail, hospitality, healthcare and financial services, Forrester Research analyst Laura Koetzle said.Questions about who will have the right to stay “will both drive footloose talent to look for jobs abroad and dissuade others from coming,” she said, as employers likely face tougher work visa regimes.Berlin, London’s biggest rival for new tech firms, is likely to become more attractive as a European base, nearly a dozen entrepreneurs told Reuters. Aspiring fintech hubs including Frankfurt, Amsterdam, Dublin and Switzerland also could see more investment shift in their direction, financial services players said.Matthias Kroener, head of Munich-based internet bank Fidor, which entered Britain only last year, said: “Fintechs with the European market in their sights, may pull the plug on London because as young companies with the smallest roots they can react fastest and move first.”The vote requires Britain to file a two-year notice of plans to leave Europe, creating a period of uncertainty that will have immediate effect on overall technology and advertising spending, as well as fragile startups, analysts and entrepreneurs said.Number26 is likely to focus on other countries in Europe before expanding to the U.S. or Asia starting in 2018, although it has not ruled out the UK market completely, Stalf said.”The decision weakens Britain but it is not good for Europe altogether. Suddenly, the common market has shrunk by 60 million people,” the Berlin-based executive said.The decision is a setback for Europe generally, which in recent years has been out-gunned by five-fold in tech funding by the United States and twice over by Asia, as its bids to build world-class firms capable of taking on Apple, Google, Amazon and Uber.Budgets at riskTechnology spending for both Britain and Western Europe will turn negative both this year and next due to uncertainty caused by ongoing political volatility, said John Lovelock, chief forecaster for global technology market research firm Gartner.U.K. spending will sink by 0.3 percent in 2016 and 3 percent in 2017, the world’s largest corporate technology advisory firm now estimates, while expected tepid growth of 0.2 percent across Western Europe will fall to an unspecified level below zero.Gartner previously saw U.K. tech spending growing 1.7 percent in 2016 and 2 percent in 2017. The tech sector accounts for around 10 percent of British gross domestic product.Frost & Sullivan, another research firm, said start-ups face steeper funding and credit hurdles, with the big question mark whether the European Investment Fund (EIF), the largest investor in U.K. venture capital firms, will continue to invest there, and for how long.But not everyone thinks Brexit will harm London startups.”People are going to continue to live in London, the world’s hippest city. Whether or not the U.K. is part of the European Union, it still has a super business environment,” said Mark Tluszcz, co-founder and CEO of Mangrove Capital Partners, a Luxembourg-based venture capital firm with $750 million under management. With 15 to 20 percent of his portfolio in Britain, he’s still looking for fresh prospects.Oleg Fomenko is a Russian-born London entrepreneur whose latest company, Sweatcoin, is a fitness app which pays people to be more active. He said entrepreneurs adapt quickly.”The whole country turned around 180 degrees,” Formenko said. “If anyone knows how to get through this, it’s us.”(By Eric Auchard; additional reporting by Andreas Kroener in Frankfurt and Meg Garner in San Francisco; editing by Anna Willard) How Success Happens June 28, 2016last_img read more

Rep Griffin bill clarifies leasepurchase agreement guidelines for schools

first_img Categories: Griffin News,News 13Feb Rep. Griffin bill clarifies lease-purchase agreement guidelines for schools Legislator: Informative measure can now lead to more savings for school districtsA bill proposed by state Rep. Beth Griffin of Mattawan which clears up language in existing law regarding lease-purchase agreements today was overwhelmingly advanced in a bipartisan vote by the Michigan House.Lease-purchase agreements provide school boards and intermediate school districts with flexibility when they are looking to lower operating costs through energy conservation or operational improvements. The agreement acts as a pay-as-you-go system, allowing districts to use money generated through energy savings to pay for an ongoing project or begin another.Griffin has expressed concern about interpretations of statute that are not consistent with the intent of the original bill – House Bill 4080, which became Public Act 23 of 2017 upon being signed by the governor.“There are school districts who have been told that these agreements only work if they are directly related to energy conservation,” Griffin said. “We needed this bill to clarify that this is an option that can be used for more broadly-defined operational improvements. The narrower the interpretation gets with the existing law, the less schools will actually be able to lower energy and operational costs and that means less money to go back into our classrooms.”Like its predecessor, HB 5238 does not mandate school districts to enter into lease-purchase agreements when considering improvements to facilities.“Schools are looking to get as much out of every dollar they spend and energy efficiency helps make that possible,” Griffin said. “This is merely a cost-saving program available to districts looking to make improvements. Every dollar saved and every cost avoided means more money for teachers and students.”HB 5238 previously received unanimous, bipartisan approval from the House Local Government Committee on Jan. 31 and now moves to the Senate for further consideration.last_img read more

first_img$188 $(56) 2011 $606 Cash & Equivalents Free Cash Flow $153 $1,000 Revenue 2010 $1,974 $(138) 2009 $66 $777 2008 $3,711 $3,908 $297 $(55) 2007 $(88) $470 Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or on MySpace) for the last two weeks, you’ve most likely heard that social networking giant Facebook filed for its IPO.   The form S-1 contains a plethora of information “the Street” had been mulling over for months. Most important was the company’s 2011 net income, which was up 65% annually to $1 billion.   Although the company had a net income loss for 2007 and 2008, its earnings growth since has been astounding. Since 2009, the company has averaged annual net income growth of 115%, while revenue has increased on average 80% over the same period. $272 $1,785 $229 $633 $305 Net Income The company has been amassing a treasure chest of cash. With nearly $4 billion at the end of 2011, Facebook can cover operating expenses for two years without any additional revenue, granting investors a wide margin of safety. Free cash flow has consistently grown since 2008, with an average annualized growth of 103%.   In addition to the income numbers, the public was able to peek inside Facebook’s user base for the first time. According to the form S-1, the company had 845 million monthly active users (MAUs) and 483 million daily active users (DAUs) at the end of 2011, up 39% and 48%, respectively.(Click on image to enlarge)However, as Andrew Sorkin points out, Facebook is very, should we say, generous when calculating its user base. The main point of contention is that Facebook counts users as “active” even if they didn’t actually visit Facebook.com, which skews the company’s reach and thus the amount advertisers would be willing to pay for ad space.To Facebook, a user is considered “active” if he or she “took an action to share content or activity with his or her Facebook friends or connections via a third-party Web site that is integrated with Facebook.”For example, if you clicked the “Like” button on a New York Times article, shared music on Spotify, or signed into the Wall Street Journal using your Facebook account and left a comment that was subsequently shared on Facebook, you’re counted as an active user, even though none of these actions actually took place on Facebook.com. The catch is that advertisers won’t have an opportunity to market products to these “active” users.Even though Facebook seems to have massaged its active users stats, Nielson estimates that Facebook had roughly 153 million MAUs in December, which is only 8 million off the prospectus estimate of 161 million MAUs. So, the company does have a healthy advertising base and appears to be fundamentally strong. Even so, there are other risks that the company will need to overcome in order to continue its success.Growth(Click on image to enlarge)As the graph above illustrates, growth in key markets such as North America and Europe is already tapering off. Sources claim the US market could already have a saturation rate of 75%. From the form S-1: “We believe that our rates of user and revenue growth will decline over time. For example, our annual revenue grew 154% from 2009 to 2010 and 88% from 2010 to 2011. Historically, our user growth has been a primary driver of growth in our revenue. Our user growth and revenue growth rates will inevitably slow as we achieve higher market penetration rates, as our revenue increases to higher levels, and as we experience increased competition.”Once Facebook’s user base inevitably plateaus, their performance will become increasingly dependent on their ability to increase levels of user engagement, which entails generating new, useful products. However, Facebook still has opportunities for user growth in emerging markets, such as Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.AdvertisingFor 2009, 2010, and 2011, advertising accounted for 98%, 95%, and 85%, respectively, of Facebook’s revenue.Working in their favor is Facebook’s vast knowledge of their users, which could allow the company to deliver ever-increasingly targeted ads. If they can increase the relevance of their ads, they’ll be able to increase their advertising base, along with the price they charge per click, thus providing an opportunity to raise revenues.One caveat to this opportunity is that Facebook is at the forefront of complex and evolving US and foreign laws and regulations regarding privacy and data protection, which could result in regulatory action in coming years. This could entail future restrictions on the data Facebook can gather and use to deliver targeted ads. MobileCurrently, Facebook’s mobile app does not carry advertisements. With more and more users accessing Facebook through mobile devices, the company will need to reevaluate its mobile strategy.Without any leverage in the mobile marketplace, an opportunity is created for Google to push its Google+ social network on Android devices, along with Apple’s recent affinity for Twitter on the iOS. Without a native mobile operating system, Facebook is at a clear disadvantage.However, Google+ has had difficulty gaining traction and currently has “only” 90 million users, while Facebook is still considered a mainstay in the social networking industry.Key-Man RiskLast but certainly not least, the company’s chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg poses a significant key-man risk for the company. Zuckerberg (who was mentioned 113 times in the S-1 filing) owns a large majority of the company’s voting stock and thus has control over key decisions. Placing this much emphasis on one person (regardless of how brilliant) is rarely a good idea.On the flip side, Zuckerberg’s track record proves he can lead a growing, profitable company. But the question is whether he’ll be able to keep it up.last_img read more

Prime Minister Theresa May has called for a deep trade and security relationship with Brussels after Britain leaves the European Union in March 2019, and hopes to have a deal agreed in principle by October.A document presented to the European Commission last week and published on Wednesday outline plans for a treaty on internal security and models of cooperation on foreign policy and in defence operations.But officials have been taken aback by Brussels’ decision to deny London access to encrypted signals from the EU’s Galileo satellite navigation system, citing legal issues about sharing sensitive information with a non-member state.Britain played a major role in developing the £9 billion (10 billion euros, $12 billion) project, an alternative to the US’ GPS which is expected to be fully operational in 2026.Being frozen out due to security concerns could have implications for the rest of the partnership, the government document warns.”The arrangements for any UK cooperation on Galileo are an important test of the depth of operational cooperation and information-sharing envisaged under the security partnership,” it said.It demands continued British access to the secure signal and a right to compete for contracts.Britain is looking into developing its own, separate system if the EU maintains its position, and has also raised the question of Galileo’s use of Britain’s overseas territories as monitoring bases.The Times newspaper meanwhile reported Wednesday that the government is looking at ways to ban British-based technology companies from transferring sensitive information overseas.Elsewhere, the document set out plans for a new treaty allowing Britain to continue using EU internal security measures such as the European Arrest Warrant, participate in agencies such as Europol, and continue the swift and secure exchange of data and criminal records.Britain also wants to agree ways to allow it to contribute to EU defence missions on a case-by-case basis, as well as defence research projects and defence planning.It points to the common threats faced by all European countries, from terrorism to illegal immigration, cyber threats and aggression, which has been blamed for a March chemical weapons attack in the English city of Salisbury. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Officials have been taken aback by Brussels’ decision to deny London access to encrypted signals from the EU’s Galileo satellite navigation system, the launch of four of which are seen in 2017, citing legal issues about sharing sensitive information © 2018 AFP Brexit prompts UK to probe developing satellite navigation system Explore further Citation: Satellite row tests UK’s post-Brexit security plans (2018, May 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-satellite-row-uk-post-brexit.html Britain outlined its proposals Wednesday for close security cooperation with the EU after Brexit, but these risk being undermined by the bloc’s refusal to share sensitive data on the Galileo satellite project. read more