上海贵族宝贝sh1314

first_img Love Letters Alan Alda and Candice Bergen begin their limited run in the Broadway revival of A.R. Gurney’s Love Letters on November 9, taking over from Brian Dennehy and Carol Burnett. Directed by Gregory Mosher, the pair will appear at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre through December 5. They will be followed by casts of stars in strictly limited engagements that include Anjelica Huston, Stacy Keach, Diana Rigg and Martin Sheen. Love Letters is a funny and emotional portrait about the powerful connection of love. Two friends, rebellious Melissa Gardner and straight-arrow Andrew Makepeace Ladd III have exchanged notes, cards and letters with each other for over 50 years. From second grade, through summer vacations, to college, and well into adulthood, they have spent a lifetime discussing their hopes and ambitions, dreams and disappointments, and victories and defeats. But long after the letters are done, the real question remains: Have they made the right choices or is the love of their life only a letter away? The production has also previously starred Mia Farrow. Keach and Rigg will play December 6 through January 9, 2015. Huston and Sheen will then play January 10 through February 15. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 14, 2014 View Commentslast_img read more

first_imgFour University of Georgia Extension agents have been collectively awarded this year’s Urban Agriculture Education Award from the Georgia Urban Ag Council, a statewide association for professionals involved in all sectors of the urban agriculture industry. The award is typically given to one UGA Extension agent who developed and implemented an innovative and successful educational and applied research program to support the professionals in Georgia’s urban agriculture industry. Together, the agents developed Green University, an annual program targeted at green industry professionals in northwest Georgia.Northwest Georgia agents working togetherAgents who planned the training event include Keith Mickler, agricultural and natural resources agent and county Extension coordinator in Floyd County; Rolando Orellana, agricultural and natural resources agent in north Fulton County; Paul Pugliese, agricultural and natural resources agent in Bartow County; and Mary Carol Sheffield, agriculture and natural resources and county Extension coordinator in Paulding County. The joint training venture was Sheffield’s idea. “I’ve been hosting green industry updates for several years in Paulding County, but we revamped as ‘Green University’ a few years ago to help give the training a clearer connection to UGA Extension and the university research behind the trainings,” she said.The agents decided to focus the training on pesticide safety, selection, handling and proper application after receiving numerous homeowner samples from within their respective counties indicating injury to landscapes by pesticide applications made by industry professionals. “Home landscapes are a valuable asset to home values, and homeowners don’t always understand the complexity of managing them. Urban ag professionals who invest the time to attend trainings are more able to help educate their clients on important management practices and are less likely to make mistakes or cause damage to homeowners’ landscapes,” Sheffield said. Teaching the proper way to use pesticidesThe Green University, held Jan. 15, 2014, focused on the effects of phenoxy herbicides (like 2,4-D) on trees and shrubs, detailed the potential for injury and highlighted possible liability should these herbicides be used incorrectly. “When it comes to weed control, green industry professionals get a lot of information from product marketing,” Sheffield said. “To make sure they know the latest research-based information, we taught them how to choose appropriate pesticides for turf weed management and to rotate active ingredient and pesticide classes to maximize weed control.”Thirty-one professionals from seven metro-Atlanta and northwest Georgia counties attended the training. Of those, 19 received Georgia commercial pesticide applicators’ continuing education credits, one received Alabama commercial pesticide applicators’ continuing education credits and nine received continuing education units for International Society of Arboriculture arborist certifications. Pre- and post-tests show the attendees are now better equipped to reduce injury to trees and shrubs from turf-applied herbicides, to reduce the potential for resistance in weeds through proper herbicide selection, to practice safe work habits and to use soil testing appropriately in northwest Georgia landscapes. Participant and certified arborist Randy Cooper admitted thinking pesticide damage from phenoxy chemicals was caused by aerial drift. “I did not consider that phenoxy chemicals could harm plants through root absorption. This class added to my knowledge and diagnostic skills as an arborist and a consultant. To me, this is Extension as it was intended to be,” he said. For information on trainings offered by your local UGA Extension office, call 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

first_imgJonny Bairstow and Adil Rashid guided a depleted England side to a four-wicket victory over the West Indies on Tuesday in the first Twenty20.England excused four of their first-choice side after the drawn ODI series – Jos Buttler, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes and Moeen Ali – but Bairstow plugged a big gap in the batting lineup with a career-best 68 from 40 balls.Opening for the first time in 28 matches he broke the back of a 161-run target, which owed much to Rashid’s miserly return of 1-15. Tom Curran walked away with four wickets as the West Indies posted 160-8 but it was Rashid’s precise stint which did most to stall the home side.Joe Denly and Sam Billings both fell with the end line in sight but Curran reappeared to hit the winning boundary with seven balls remaining.Chris Gayle, the man-of-the-series in the ODIs, fell to Chris Jordan’s wide yorker which he could only squeeze to short third man. Shimron Hetmyer also failed to leave his mark on proceedings, chipping in with 14 before pumping a Curran full toss straight to mid-on.Darren Bravo and Nicholas Pooran helped claw back some of the lost ground, as the fourth-wicket pair added 64 in 51 balls but were parted in style by the returning Jordan.#WIvENG “Whatever I can do to achieve for the team is priority” – Nicholas Pooran on his mindset for the T20 Series #MenInMaroon #ItsOurGameListen to the interview!pic.twitter.com/edjhllmfbuWindies Cricket (@windiescricket) March 6, 2019The reply began in a flurry of activity as Sheldon Cottrell’s opening over contained 17 runs, a dropped catch and finally the wicket of Alex Hales.advertisementJoe Root’s hopes of sharpening his T20 skills lasted exactly two balls, lbw to Cottrell attempting to open up the leg-side, but Bairstow was unaffected.He launched himself into a 13-ball sequence containing five boundaries and one six, driving England to 62 for two in the powerplay, well ahead of the West Indies benchmark.Bairstow nicked Carlos Brathwaite on 34 but a fingertip catch skimmed off Hope’s gloves and brought him four more. Brathwaite did manage to see off skipper Eoin Morgan but Bairstow was dropped again by Cottrell shortly after reaching a 27-ball 50 with his second six.We take a 1-0 lead in the series!!Scorecard: https://t.co/FmcHZ8Jd1A#WIvENG pic.twitter.com/9u1ROvPmuVEngland Cricket (@englandcricket) March 5, 2019By the time he was held at wide long-on, he had left a target of 58 in 50 balls.Billings and Denly, both of whom are still seeking to find their place in the England set-up, chalked off all but eight of the required runs in calm fashion before nerves struck.Holder persuaded Denly to hole out with 14 balls remaining then Billings had a let-off next ball, Oshane Thomas just failing to hang to a mis-cued pull at fine leg.Reprieved, Billings then swiped at a Cottrell cutter that knocked back his stumps. Four byes over Hope’s head eased the growing tension allowing Curran to slog the winning runs.last_img read more