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first_imgIt hasn’t been the type of wild ride Disney fans are used to or enjoy.Disney World and Disneyland have both been closed for an unprecedented 11 days due to the CoronaVirus pandemic. And now it is being announced that both parks will not be opening on April 1st as originally planned.According to a report released by a Walt Disney Company spokesperson, it has now been decided that both parks and all associated resorts will remain closed indefinitely until they can come up with a solid timeline to reopen.The statement also went onto say that they will continue to pay all of their employees through April 18th.last_img read more

first_imgWEST LONG BRANCH –  On Thursday, February 9 at 1 p.m. in the Club Dining Room, Magill Commons, Negro League Baseball expert Larry Hogan will present  “Before You Can Say ‘Jackie Robinson’: Black Baseball in America & NJ in the Era of the Color Line.”   Mr. Hogan will be accompanied by two former Negro League baseball players Mr. Robert Scott and Mr. Pedro Sierra.  Mr. Hogan was on the MLB Hall of Fame committee that voted on the recent induction of Black ballplayers.  He is the author of the definitive book on Black baseball “Shades of Glory.” Mr. Scott was a strong right-handed pitcher whose baseball career spanned from 1941 to 1955. Mr. Sierra had a twenty-two year career that began in 1954, when he left Cuba as a 16-year-old to play for the Indianapolis Clowns in the Negro League and included two stints in the Washington Senators’ system. He left baseball in 1976 and worked for the Montgomery County (Maryland) Department of Recreation for 25 years. The event is sponsored by Monmouth University’s Office of Affirmative Action & Human Relations.For additional information on Black History Month at Monmouth University, call 732-571-3526.last_img read more

first_imgBy Joseph SapiaHOLMDEL – If attending Deep Cut Orchid Society’s annual show, be careful.It could be the start of an addiction – orchid collecting. That is what happened to Joan Mesander, co-chair of this year’s show, running Thursday, Feb. 11, to Sunday, Feb. 14, at Dearborn Market in Holmdel.“I went to their (annual) show, I bought two plants, Larry (Desiano, the society’s president) talked to me and I joined,” said Mesander, 69, recalling her visit about 10 years ago.Now, she has about 500 orchids in a 225-square-foot greenhouse – with hot water and controls for heating, cooling, humidity and watering – in the backyard of her home in Middletown’s Belford section.Desiano, 66, has about 250 orchids. He’ll take them with him when he moves from his home in Middletown’s Oak Hill section to Florida, expected later this year.At this year’s show, there will be “well over 2,000” orchids, according to Diana Kleiman, a society member and an American Orchid Society-certified judge.“Why do you have an orchid show in February?” Desiano said.Because orchids raised indoors are now blooming, according to Desiano.“In general, I say November through, say, April,” said Desiano, talking about the indoor growing season. “So, February’s the middle of the season.”Helen Kroh, the show’s other co-chair, said there should be hundreds of species.The four-day show combines displaying orchids, selling them, educating people on them – a plant that has an estimated 30,000 species that grow wild on all continents except Antarctica.“We’re happy if we break even,” said Kleiman, who lives in Middletown and has about 200 orchids. “This is the way we get new members. And everybody likes to show off their plants.”The show includes displays by about a half-dozen orchid clubs from New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut, along with displays by nine vendors. Thousands attend annually, but there are no solid figures because the event is free and people roam freely.Founded in 1986, Deep Cut Orchid Society has about 110 members, mostly from Monmouth and Ocean counties. Its name comes from its former meeting site, Deep Cut Park in Middletown, but now it meets in Tinton Falls.Kroh, 66, of Milltown has been collecting orchids for 30 or 40 years, she said. She now has about 80 in a four-season sunroom.On Sunday, Feb. 7, Deep Cut members who were displaying orchids at the show gathered at Mesander’s home, where they categorized the plants in preparation for the show.“I like Epindendrums the best,” Kroh said. “I can get them to bloom. You grow what you can bloom. An orchid that does not bloom is taking up space.”“You find what works for you,” Mesander said.Desiano said he has been collecting orchids “for at least 30 years.” Then with a young family, Desiano was looking to switch from the stressful, time-consuming hobby of breeding tropical fish.So, Desiano’s wife bought him “one or two” orchids, because he had shown an interest in them, he said.“I think the passion comes out of the diversity (of orchids),” Desiano said.A tangle of orchids.A benefit of orchids is they bloom for long periods – “for weeks and months,” Desiano said.Connie Deren, 58, who lives in Middletown’s Port Monmouth section, has been collecting for 30 years, now keeping about 150 orchids in a sunroom-greenhouse.“I started with just a few and got more,” Deren said. “Then, I met Joan (Mesender) and got more and more. I like Vandas and Paphiopedilums.”Before Mesander got the greenhouse about eight years ago, she kept about 60 orchids in her house.“I had a rack with grow lights,” Mesander said. “When I retired, my husband was afraid I was going to be bored.”So, they got the greenhouse. In warmer weather, Mesander moves her orchids outside.“I gave her an orchid for her birthday (and), three years later, she had a greenhouse,” joked Mesander’s husband, Jerry, 76. “When I saw 200 in here (in the greenhouse), I thought it was full. I was wrong.”As for the two orchids Mesander started with, “I killed those two plants,” she said.“I’ve killed many,” Deren said.“Everybody does that,” Jerry Mesander said.“If you don’t kill a lot of orchids, you’re not a true orchid grower,” she said. “You have to kill them (to understand how) to grow them.”Perhaps, by that time, one is already hooked.“You get that first plant, put it on the windowsill,” said Kleiman, smiling. “Before you know it, you’ve got the disease. You’re hooked.”***ITALS Deep Cut Orchid Society’s annual show runs Thursday, Feb. 11, to Sunday, Feb. 14, at Dearborn Market, 2170 Route 35 South at Centerville Road, Holmdel, 732-264-0256. Show hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday to Saturday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday.Deep Cut Orchid Society meets monthly at Monmouth Reform Temple, 332 Hance Ave., Tinton Falls.last_img read more

first_imgBy Timothy Schafer, The Nelson Daily The future of Morning Mountain may lie in the hands of the Nelson Cycling Club. The Regional District of Central Kootenay holds tenure on the controlled recreation area on the Crown land that used to be the Morning Mountain (Blewett) Ski Hill — and still owns property at the base of the former ski hill — but may be looking to hand that tenure over to the city’s cycling club. Community Services general manager for the RDCK, Joe Chirico, said the land used for the hill hasn’t been utilized for skiing for many years. As a result, they have been having “issues” with people trespassing on the property and they have been looking to find someone who would actively manage it. That someone could be the Nelson Cycling Club, Chirico said. “The cycling club has expressed an interest in being on the property for recreational purposes,” he said. “Lots of the trails in the Giveout Creek area would finish on the Morning Mountain property.” Over the last few years, the cycling club has held their annual fall mountain bike event — the Fat Tire Festival — on Morning Mountain, as well as extensively used the mountain biking trails above the hill in the Giveout Creek area. “They have shown interest as an active group to mange the property, … so we are looking to formalize an agreement with them,” he said. “It’s in the works but not near completion.” A meeting amongst Area E director Ramona Faust, Area F director Ron Mickel, Chirico and the RDCK’s regional park planner to discuss the options for dispensing and allocating the ski hill funds and signage is the next step in the process. [email protected]last_img read more

first_imgJust when the Kootenay Ice thought it was finally going to end the winless drought Greater Vancouver Canadians scored four times on the power play to skate away with a 6-3 B.C. Major Midget Hockey League win Saturday at the Castlegar and District Community Complex.Shane Kumar and Tyler Sandhu scored 30 seconds apart to erase a 3-2 Kootenay lead as the Canadians won game one of the two-game weekend series.Sunday, Greater Vancouver dumped Kootenay 6-1.Kootenay, sitting in the basement with a 1-17-2 record, looked every bit like the better team Saturday.Two goals by Jake Lucchini of Trail and a single by Castlegar’s Quinn Klimchuck, the latter coming with 33 seconds remaining in the second period, staked the home side to the one-goal advantage entering the third frame.But a parade to the penalty box by the Ice allowed Greater Vancouver to get its power play in gear.Spencer Shoen and Troy Sutherland completed the scoring for the Canadians, which finished the game with five power play goals.Female goalie Kimberley Newell of Nelson was in goal for Kootenay.Sunday, Kootenay continued to clutch and grab and Greater Vancouver also continued to score on special teams, finishing with three more power play markers.Six different Canadians shared in the scoring for Greater Vancouver.Michael Olson-Eyre finished the game with three points for Greater Vancouver.Justin Post of Nelson scored the lone goal for Kootenay.
Brett Soles of Cranbrook took the loss in goal for Kootenay.The Ice return to action Saturday with a game in Grand Forks against the North Island Silvertips. Game time is 4 p.m.Sunday the teams drop the puck at 10 a.m., also in the Boundary [email protected]last_img read more

first_imgAndre Schurrle, on for the injured Eden Hazard, gave Chelsea the early goal they wanted in the Champions League quarter-final second leg.The Blues, 3-1 down from the first leg, suffered a setback when talisman Hazard limped off after 18 minutes at Stamford Bridge.But his replacement struck 14 minutes later, scoring with a half-volley from near the penalty spot after Branislav Ivanovic’s long throw had been flicked on by David Luiz.Paris St-Germain, without sidelined striker Zlatan Ibrahimović, moved the ball around nicely and looked assured at the back before leaving Schurrle unmarked.The German duly punished them – unlike Gary Cahill, who missed a chance to put Chelsea level on aggregate when he blazed high and wide of the target after PSG had failed to deal with Frank Lampard’s left-wing free-kick.Chelsea: Cech; Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry, Azpilicueta; Luiz, Lampard; Willian, Oscar, Hazard (Schurrle 18); Eto’o. Subs: Schwarzer, Cole, Kalas, Mikel, Ba, Torres. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_img* * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table book* * *DENVER – The Warriors’ All-Star usually detests interviews. Even that was not going to stop Klay Thompson from smiling, though.The Warriors finished with a dominating 142-111 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Tuesday that included an NBA-record 51 first-quarter points. Thompson had 31 points while going 13-of-19 from the field and 5-of-9 from 3. But Thompson …last_img read more

first_imgTer Stegen: I’m happier in Barcelona than city I was bornby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona goalkeeper Marc-Andre ter Stegen admits he feels more settled in Spain than in Germany.Ter Stegen is now firmly established as Barca’s No1 keeper.He told Libero: “The kindness of the people has made it much easier for me. “It is not normal for me to be treated so well. This gives me a lot of life. In our profession, everyone is looking at you and wants to make an opinion about you. And I would not like to change because I’m a natural person.””It was very important for me to get to a city that you can identify with. I think that if you come to a place that does not convince you, you can not be comfortable for many years in that place and feel good. There are players who do not care much, but I do, and now I almost feel better here than in the city where I was born.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more