June 2021

first_imgSaturday 19th March – Ireland v England – 5pmSaturday 19th March – France v Wales – 7.45pm The fixture list for the 2011 RBS 6 Nations has been announced with another tantalising finale is in store for rugby fans. On March 19, Grand Slam holders France host Wales in the final match of the tournament while England travel to the refurbished and renamed Aviva Stadium to take on Ireland and Scotland play Italy keen to avenge their 16-12 defeat.The opening weekend on February 4/5 – which already sees Wales and England make history by starting the Championship on a Friday night – are a reverse of 2010’s first round games with Ireland and Scotland travelling to Italy and France respectively.Ireland’s first match back at Landsdowne Road after four years at Croke Park is at home to Les Bleus the following weekend.The tournament takes on extra significance with the 2011 World Cup just months away and David Pickering, Chairman of the Six Nations Council, said: “The RBS 6 Nations Championship remains the envy of the rugby world, a tournament played with pride and passion and drenched in history and tradition”.All UK time – Add 1 hour for France and ItalyRBS Six Nations Fixture Schedule 2011Friday 4th February – Wales v England – 7.45pmSaturday 5th February – Italy v Ireland – 2.30pmSaturday 5th February – France v Scotland – 5pmSaturday 12th February – England v Italy – 2.30pmSaturday 12th February – Scotland v Wales – 5pmSunday 13th February – Ireland v France – 3pm 19/20 February FreeSaturday 26th February – Italy v Wales – 2.30pmSaturday 26th February – England v France – 5pmSunday 27th February – Scotland v Ireland – 3pm5/6 March FreeSaturday 12th March – Italy v France – 2.30pmSaturday 12th March – Wales v Ireland – 5pmSunday 13th March – England v Scotland – 3pmSaturday 19th March – Scotland v Italy – 2.30pmcenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

first_imgRelegation battle: Mike Phillips is integral to Bayonne’s survival in the Top 14By Gavin MortimerTWO ROUNDS of the Top 14 to go and down at the foot of the table it’s looking tight. Lyon are doomed, that much is sure, even though the club clearly doesn’t intend to hang around too long in Division Two. Last month they announced the signings of Lionel Nallet and Sebastien Chabal which, along with the probable arrival of hooker Huw Bennett from the Ospreys, should ensure they bounce straight back up.But who will join Lyon in taking their leave from the Top 14? In theory it could be any one of six clubs – Agen, Biarritz, Perpignan, Bordeaux-Begles, Brive and Bayonne – though the last two are in the greatest peril. Brive and Bayonne are stuck on 42 points, three fewer than the rest of their relegation-threatened rivals, and both have crucial home encounters this weekend.  Brive host Bordeaux-Begles while Bayonne entertain Agen, must-win games for both as what follows on the last weekend of the championship is grim. Brive travel to Clermont, who haven’t lost a home league match for 42 matches, while Bayonne go to Castres, who’ll be hoping to secure their place in the play-offs with a victory.Brive’s English fly-half Shane Geraghty has already announced he’s jumping ship whatever the outcome of the relegation dogfight, returning to London Irish in a two-year year deal. The future of scrum-half Mike Phillips at Bayonne, however, is less uncertain. At the end of March the French rugby newspaper Midi Olympique announced that the Welshman, who turns 30 in August, would “stay at Bayonne next year even if the club is relegated to Division Two”. It added that Phillips, capped 65 times by Wales, was even prepared to “accept a drop in wage in the event of relegation”. Phillips is staying mum on the subject, preferring to do his talking on the pitch and doing his best to drag Bayonne out of the mire. He put in a man-of-the-match performance in the 24-19 derby victory over Biarritz last month, and was also to the fore when Bayonne beat Lyon the following week, two victories that have given the club a fighting chance of avoiding the drop to financial oblivion.But if Bayonne were to be relegated would Phillips really stay on? Next season culminates with a Lions tour to Australia and nine months in the anonymity of the French Second Division, playing against the likes of Albi and Auch, won’t exactly help Phillips stake a claim for selection in Warren Gatland’s squad. There are a lot of good No 9’s in British and Irish rugby right now, and there was the odd sign during Wales’ Six Nations success that Phillips was a yard off the pace in thought and deed. He needs to be keeping himself sharp and testing himself against the best week in and week out if he wants to be on the plane Down Under – not wasting himself with Bayonne in the back of beyond. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img But a fortnight ago a report appeared in WalesOnline.co.uk calling into question Phillips’ future with Bayonne if they did go down. “Phillips has a long-term deal with Bayonne,” ran the report, “but it’s unclear whether he has a release clause should they be relegated.”last_img read more

first_imgNOT FOR FEATURED LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS When Jackson missed his third kick, cries went out for Ronan O’Gara to come on and do what he has done for the last 12 years; control the game and kick the points. However he didn’t manage it against England and unfortunately it was more of the same at Murrayfield. O’Gara looked a shadow of his former self and this was compounded with that cross-field kick along his own 22 that almost resulted in a Scotland try.Paddy Jackson did not lose that game for Ireland. Some of those much more experienced than him made poor decisions and just underperformed.Bloodied but unbowed: Kelly Brown and Scotland celebrateWhat if Keith Earls had just passed to the unmarked O’Driscoll instead of running himself and allowing Sean Maitland to knock him into touch? What if Heaslip had gone for the posts more often instead of touch when the opportunity presented itself in the first half? What if the lineout had functioned as well as it normally does? What if Donnacha Ryan and Donncha O’Callaghan were just three inches taller so Jim Hamilton wasn’t able to steal the ball off their throw? Yep, too many ‘what ifs?’Ireland show all the signs of a team in transition. Their performances are inconsistent, even within the same match and although we’re seeing exciting talent finally emerge, they need time to settle into their international surroundings.The big question is what happens next? With Ireland’s Championship hopes dashed, it will be interesting to see how Declan Kidney approaches the remaining two matches. It becomes even harder for him knowing his own contract is being discussed in the corridors of power. Midfield maestro: Luke Marshall shone on his international debut, on an otherwise disappointing day for IrelandBy Claire GlancySOMETIMES THE stats do lie.If you didn’t know the score at Murrayfield on Sunday and were just handed the match data afterwards, everything would suggest that Ireland had beaten Scotland comfortably and would be joining Wales and England in having a shot at the Championship title. But as everyone knows by now, against the odds, it’s Scotland who earned that right.Leading from the front: O’Brien made 22 carries v ScotlandIn terms of possession and territory, Ireland averaged 70-80% with four line breaks to Scotland’s zilch. Not only that, they made 124 ball carries (22 alone from Sean O’Brien) when the hosts had 35 in total. Ireland should have had the game wrapped up by half-time but with only three points from the boot of Paddy Jackson on the board at that stage it spelt trouble.After the defeat to England Jamie Heaslip fronted up and admitted that too many silly mistakes had stopped Ireland from winning the game. Against Scotland they seemed to have mostly eradicated those errors but that was simply replaced by an inability to finish.Within the first 10 minutes Luke Marshall showed his potential making two sublime line-breaks. For the last few years Ulster fans have talked about this talented young center coming through, “He’s the real deal”, “The next Brian O’Driscoll,” and like Craig Gilroy in November, and Simon Zebo against Wales, Marshall delivered on his Six Nations debut.For Ireland’s other new recruit, Paddy Jackson, the day did not pan out quite so well. In terms of controlling play, threatening the gain line, pulling defenders, making tackles and delivering ball, he came out with credit. The primary role of the outside half is to be the place kicker – an added pressure to his debut, particularly when coming back from an ankle injury. Kidney could use the France and Italy games to allow his younger plays to gel and gain more experience in international rugby but at the same time he has players who need their Six Nations to finish well if they are to have any hope of making the Lions tour. Warrren Gatland was at Murrayfield and there could well be a couple more Scottish names on his team sheet this week at the expense of their Irish counterparts. Troubling times, indeed.Follow Claire Glancy on Twitter @claireglancylast_img read more

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS South Africans Jaque Fourie and Fourie du Preez still feature for the Boks while playing their rugby in Japan, but there are others who are out there potentially rebuilding. Peter Grant and Andries Bekker are out there while still-young Frans Steyn staged a walkout with the Boks and is now just a Japanese club player, while Schalk Burger will be a Sungoliath. Stranger things have happened than such players heading back to Super Rugby.It would be naïve to suggest that all of these guys are involved in Japanese rugby just to sup at the Fountain of Youth. But prolonging a career and smoothing out some old knocks could be a lovely by-product of chasing eastern coin and who knows, the local lads and Brave Blossom stalwarts could continue to raise their game thanks to these foreign interlopers. Back in black: Jerome Kaino has returned to the All Blacks’ starting team after a stint playing in Japan We ask a former All Black now in Japan: can an ‘easier’ few seasons in Japan make you great on the international stage again?center_img So hold on. Japanese rugby is easier, so you can, like George Smith, come right back in to Test rugby after kicking back for a while?Thomson, affectionately known as the Wooly Mammoth around Dunedin, explains: “I already feel regenerated since moving to Japan, myself. When I left in 2012 I was pretty beat up from back-to-back super rugby and internationals. Coming to Japan I have had the benefit of a five-month preseason. Five months (worth of work) over only six weeks back home (in New Zealand) is massive. I can’t remember if I have ever felt physically better prepared for rugby and the results are showing with personal bests in fitness testing and feeling great on the field. I don’t know if I want to come home but I have no doubt that I would be physically ready to do so if the desire arises.”This must be good news for coaches who have seen their players head to the Far East.While Japanese players have clearly benefited from playing alongside internationals – though we cannot deny the input of good coaches like Eddie Jones and the future input of Steve Borthwick, Robbie Deans, Gary Gold and Rob Penney for Japanese kids playing pro rugby – it is the big internationals who may be more happy that they may have some ‘rejuvinated’ old hands set to come back.All smiles: Eddie Jones has enjoyed his time in Japan, while the country has improvedIt is rumoured in France that Israel Folau will snub the French Top 14 to sign up to play in Japan in the near future. Off course, there are a few big players there already.All Blacks Richard Kahui, Anthony Boric and Isaia Toeava do not have long left in Japan, should they refuse to renew current contracts and lauded team player George Whitelock is leaving Crusaders to join Panasonic Wild Knights. What’s going on in Japan? While players are heading over there for short stints, some cash and some rugby the Brave Blossoms are improving on the international stage.There are vast sums of money there, big international players are scattered throughout the Top League, and now the Japan national side are into the top ten of the IRB’s official world rankings. Most probably some still snigger about the level of rugby being played there, but while the Japanese have a truncated domestic calendar, things are undoubtedly improving.Here is the anomaly: many playing over there tell of less-bruising competition and less rugby in general, but the country have the 2019 World Cup coming, Japanese stars are filtering into Super Rugby and further afield while Super Rugby players are now prepared to travel to Asia instead of Europe. This is all promising stuff, but now big players southern hemisphere stars are coming out the other end as well, ready to play at the top of international rugby again.Look at Jerome Kaino.The all-action back-rower recently returned to the Auckland Blues after a stint in Japan just after winning the 2011 World Cup with the All Blacks. There were doubts about whether he could hack it at the top again, but Steve Hansen recalled the breakaway for the recent Test series against England and he thrived, starting all three matches.This guy had gone to Japan, a suspected retirement home for Test men, and instead has returned in better shape than almost any other 31-year-old smasher. What’s the deal?International draw: Adam Thomson drags Irish defenders with him for the All Blacks in 2012“Jerome was able to rejuvenate the body while working on skills with decreased physicality in the Japanese league and I think we are seeing the benefits of the man being healthy and hungry again,” former All Black No 8 and current Canon Eagle Adam Thomson tells Rugby World.“Jerome has coped very well with his return from Japan to NZ rugby because he is a world-class player and unmatched when physically fit and on top of his game. By the end of 2011 the demands on him were huge and the physical toll of playing that style of rugby will eventually wear you down. Japan has given him the opportunity to refresh in a new environment.”last_img read more

first_img TAGS: The Greatest Players LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Major teams: Auckland, HarlequinsCountry: New Zealand
Test span: 1987-97New Zealand caps: 58 (54 starts)Test points: 89 (17T, 3DG) Strong and agile, Zinnie was a back-row like no other. “He had better kicking and handling skills than some fly-halves playing international rugby,” former England captain Will Carling wrote in 2007. “You align that with his strength and ability to read the game – he was unique.”He captained Auckland Blues to Super 12 titles in 1996 and 1997 and also played for New Zealand Maori.Brooke’s 1995 drop-goal proved to be no one-off, as he kicked another against South Africa in 1996 and his third and last in Test rugby versus Wales in November 1997. The 17 Test tries he scored was a world record for a forward when he won his last cap, against England at Twickenham in 1997.center_img How many forwards are best remembered for kicking a drop-goal? Not many, but the extraordinary kick Zinzan Brooke slotted from almost 50m out during New Zealand’s 1995 World Cup semi-final win over England left an indelible imprint on the memory of anyone who saw it.The three points helped New Zealand win 45-29 and stole just a little of the limelight from Jonah Lomu, who battered his way over for four tries that day.It was the 31st Test in Brooke’s 58-cap career and the dominant role the No 8 was playing in the All Blacks side at that stage disguises the stuttering start he made.The son of a farmer from the countryside just north of Auckland, Brooke first turned out for the All Blacks against Argentina in June 1987, but had to wait until July 1989 for his second cap as Buck Shelford was still first choice.By 1991 Brooke was firmly established in the New Zealand side and the following year he was joined by Robin, one of his four brothers, who won 62 caps. Brooke stayed on in London, playing for Harlequins in 39 Premiership and Heineken Cup games from 1998-2000 and coaching the club until 2002. He turned out for Coventry in 2002-03, then played for his new home-town club, Windsor, where the father of six is still a member and coaches youngsters including his son.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

first_imgFull-back Alex Goode is the final man to make it into our XV. He has been brilliant this year for Saracens and he must (still) be thinking: “What do I have to do to make the squad?” He leads the Premiership in most metres gained, most carries and has often been the most creative aspect of the Saracens backline. It is no secret Eddie Jones is not a fan, so he will have to make do with being the full-back in our XV.Goode frustrated: Despite being one of the stars of the Saracens backline, Goode just can’t breakthrough into the England squad There a lot of quality players not selected by the 6 coaches this year, so Sam Tremlett has put together a team of 15 players omitted from international duty LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A XV of stars not selected for the 2018 Six NationsFront Row – Cyril Baille, Luke Cowan-Dickie, Lorenzo CittadiniCyril Baille should fit the bill for new France head coach Jacques Brunel, but it’s too much, too soon – he’s only now back from a torn Achilles. Baille played every game in the 2017 Six Nations Championship, and consistently performs for a solid Toulouse side. He should work his way back.Luke Cowan-Dickie has always had to contend with Dylan Hartley and Jamie George for time with England. And now tackling machine Tom Dunn of Bath is in ahead of him. Some critics say he still need to improve his throwing, but he is certainly a dynamic force with ball in hand.The final front row position in our XV goes to Lorenzo Cittadini. He has huge experience, which can be no bad thing for the Italians. Yes he is 35, but front row players never play 80 minutes any more, do they? Simone Ferrari, 23, is seen as the future at tighthead, but we’ve opted for an old head here.Second Row – Donnacha Ryan, Scott CummingsYoung Giant: Cummings has been playing exceptional rugby for Glasgow this season, so his omission was a surpriseThe ever-menacing Ryan has not been selected due to the IRFU’s policy of prioritising home-based players, so the Racing 92 man missed out. Unfortunately for them, Ryan is playing exception rugby at the moment. He even set up a try at the weekend with a kick ahead!Young Scotsman Scott Cummings is another scrapping to pick up experience. Gregor Townsend selected him into the 2017 autumn International squad, and despite not playing, you can forgive Cummings for thinking he was going to continue to be part of the Scotland set up. He has been playing well for Pro14 deivision leaders Glasgow Warriors, with his lineout work being of particular note. Cummings is tied 4th for the most lineouts won in the Pro14 this season with 37, so his skills in the air are clear to see.Back Row – Olly Cracknell, Don Armand, Louis PicamolesPerplexing: Don Armand has proven time and again he deserves an England call up, and yet Jones has snubbed him once againInjuries to Sam Warburton and Taulupe Faletau open up spots in the back row but Olly Cracknell has not been called up to fill one of them – West Walians and neutrals alike are thrilled that James Davies joins that unit, while Cracknell misses out. He was part of the Welsh set up last Six Nations, and has shone for the U20 side. Additionally, whilst playing for Ospreys, it is clear he is no stranger to a heavy workload as he leads the Pro14 in carries, and tackles.Don Armand is the player most fans are shocked not to see in Eddie Jones’ squad. He has been a star for Exeter for the majority of the season, with man of the match awards piling up. It seems Jones questions whether Armand can carry through traffic but he has proven on countless occasions how strong he is in that area. He gets over the gain-line and does the dirty work all back-rowers are supposed to do.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERERounding out the forwards is Louis Picamoles. Youth and speed have been the hallmarks of Brunel’s back-row selection, but some still wonder if the older face could still fit. He gives go forward ball at the back of the scrum and his experience is undeniable. Despite his indifferent personal form, he is captain of a Montpellier side leading the Top 14 at the moment. Scrum Half – Dan RobsonAttention Eddie: Dan Robson’s (left) play can no longer be ignored by Eddie JonesIn a Wasps side that has so much potency on attack, Robson does a fantastic job getting the offence on the front foot. Ben Youngs and Danny Care are the two scrum-halves Jones trusts but there will come a point where he has to pay attention to the play of Robson.Fly Half – Francois Trinh-DucExperienced: Trinh-Duc would offer huge experience to a French squad that badly needs itThe Frenchman has not been on top form for Toulon this year and young Anthony Belleau has been seen as a true leading fly-half. With youngster Matthieu Jalibert being thrown in at the deep end, and Belleau is also lurking. Does it make sense for us to big up this struggling veteran? No, but then French Test sides have never been logical places…Centres – Jamie Roberts, Tom FarrellRoberts Rejuvenated: Jamie Roberts has improved his form for harlequins, and yet still doesn’t make Gatland’s squadWith a midfield that no longer can rely on Jonathan Davies, Jamie Roberts steadiness at the heart of the Harlequins backline might have seen him come in as a mentor of sorts for the more inexperienced player. However Gatland had other ideas and the 94-cap giant may never bring up the century of caps now. Hadleigh Parkes, Owen and Scott Williams may have more subtlety and gas but we’ve gone for the sentimental choice here.Lesser-known Tom Farrell takes the other centre spot in our XV. The injury to Garry Ringrose opened up a hole to be filled in the Ireland squad, and the Connacht centre has been outstanding. Sure there are a lot of options for Ireland to experiment with and there have been other players blooded as recently as November… but we’re saying keep an eye on him. He leads the Pro14 in offloads, is second in carries, and third in defenders beaten this year.Back Three – Olly Woodburn, Simon Zebo, Alex GoodeOlly Omitted: Woodburn has been one of the stars of the Premiership this seasonWoodburn has been one of the standout players for the Premiership-leading Exeter Chiefs. He is at the vanguard for them in terms of metres gained, a category he is second in for the entire Premiership. He is also in the top three for carries, defenders beaten and finally he leads the league in clean breaks. This year he is deadly and can play on the wing or in the centre. Working against him would be his lack of experience, but there is only one way to get that… by playing.Simon Zebo, owned an Irish wing position during the last two editions of the Six Nations, however he has recently signed with Racing 92 for next season, which will see him join his countryman Ryan. As indicated above, the IRFU has put more emphasis on selecting home-based players so this is the main factor for Zebo’s omission (although he has been vocal about the way Ireland deploy wings, too).last_img read more

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Get to know Daniel Brennan, the son of Trevor and the prop who guided France to glory in the U20 Six Nations in 2018 Toulouse is a great club but I wasn’t getting enough opportunities, so I decided I needed to leave to get more games. I had interest from Clermont, Castres and Munster but I wanted to stay in the French system.I had a chat with Vern Cotter, the Montpellier coach, and was impressed, and there will be the chance to learn from Jannie du Plessis, one of the best tightheads around.How do you unwind away from rugby? PlayStation, hang out with friends. When it’s not raining, I do a bit of fishing.Do you fancy your chances in the U20 World Championship? The fact it’s in France is great. We won the Six Nations but lost to England so didn’t get the Grand Slam, but we’re in a good place and should go in with confidence.Are you dreaming of playing at RWC 2023? I think it’s in the back of all our minds. French rugby has had some tough years but it’s not dead and things are going to start changing. We’re the future and I don’t see why if we work hard we can’t win in 2023. Hotshot: France U20 prop Daniel BrennanDate of birth 23 September 1998 Born Dublin Country France Position TightheadHow much of an influence has your dad, Trevor, been on your career? Not much at the start. I played football, ice hockey and judo. I’d sometimes go training with dad when he was playing for Toulouse but he never pressurised me to play rugby.So how did you get into rugby? RWC 2007 inspired me and my friends, so we started playing. I fell in love with it.How hard was it to choose between France and Ireland? I’m proud of my Irish blood but I’ve played all my rugby in France. The country has been good to me and my family, and I love pulling on that French jersey.French success: Daniel Brennan lifts the U20 Six Nations trophy (Getty Images)What are your strengths? My carrying is pretty good and I’m working hard to improve the technical side of my game. It’s going well but I’ve got a lot to learn.Why are you leaving Toulouse for Montpellier? center_img Power surge: France’s Daniel Brennan looks to make ground against Ireland (Inpho) RW VERDICT: Trevor Brennan won 13 Ireland caps and Daniel looks set to follow in his footsteps – but in the blue of France. A teenager who stands 6ft 3in and weighs 20st, Daniel’s decision to join Montpellier should fast-track his development.This article originally appearing in the June 2018 edition of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

first_imgHowever, the players’ union has spoken out about a lack of dialogue with them Heat of battle: When Bristol and Quins met in March (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. “The RPA have been working diligently over the last 12 weeks to seek to avoid a repeat of the damaging situation the game found itself in when the clubs imposed temporary wage cuts on a unilateral basis in mid-March. This latest situation could have been entirely avoided with a collaborative and transparent approach and we now find ourselves heading towards a significant legal dispute unless meaningful and genuine dialogue takes place urgently. In the meantime, the RPA position remains unequivocal: the RPA is opposed to permanent cuts for our members.“From the outset of this crisis there has been an absolute disregard for the players and the values of the game. Players at some clubs are now being served with ultimatums and being put under undue pressure to sign amended contracts through the manufactured deadline of June 18th. To be clear, this is a totally unacceptable way to operate. Players are the lifeblood of the game and should be treated with respect. Players should not engage with this approach. The RPA will continue to fight for our members throughout this crisis.” RPA chairman Mark Lambert said: “Most of the players have already had temporary 25% pay cuts since March and April as a result of the unprecedented financial challenges exposed by Covid-19. PRL have been seeking agreement to reduce players’ wages permanently by 25% across all PRL clubs. This was unanimously rejected by the Players’ Board. Premiership Rugby agree salary cap cutAll 13 clubs in PRL – Premiership Rugby‘s administrative arm – have unanimously agreed to cut the league’s salary cap by £1.4m, bringing it down to £5m from the 2021-22 season. The reduction will be set until the end of the 2023-24 season. Then from 2024-25, the salary cap will return to a minimum of £6.4m.Other details of the salary cap changes include:Home-grown player credits will be retained up to £600,000.International and EPS player credits will be retained but limited to a maximum of £400,000.Season-long loans salary cap exemption will be removed.The academy ceiling will remain at £100,000 (this is for non-homegrown academy players) but the upper salary limit for an academy player will increase from £30,000 to £50,000. Homegrown academy players do not get counted in the £100,000.For any existing contracts that continue into the 2021-22 salary year, and beyond, their cap cost will be counted at 75% of their overall actual value, to sensibly manage the transition to new cap levels.Lord Myners’ salary cap review had suggested doing away with the ‘marquee player dispensation’ system, where two players’ salaries do not count towards the cap, but that will continue for the next two seasons.This will be reduced to just one player from the 2022-23 season, except for where a club has a current contract in place for two marquee players. In that scenario, both players may remain as ‘excluded players’ until the first of their current contracts expire.In all, this represents major change to the way Premiership clubs approach their cap allowance and on Wednesday the Rugby Players’ Association released a strongly-worded statement, speaking of their disappointment with a lack of input afforded to the players.The statement was released before details of salaries extending to 2021-22 and beyond counting at only 75% of their value in the cap, but there are still concerns from players that wages will be significantly affected by the changes. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Theological Education Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL [Seminary of the Southwest press release] Seminary of the Southwest held its sixty-third commencement on May 13th at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church, Austin.Justo González, Cuban American historian, theologian and author preached at the Holy Eucharist. The seminary awarded honorary doctorates to González, to the Rev. Alejandro Montes, the founding rector of Iglesia Episcopal San Mateo in Houston, Texas, the first Spanish speaking mission to become a parish in the United States, and to Mr. John Jockusch, philanthropist, lay leader and member of St. David’s Episcopal Church, San Antonio.Chair of the seminary’s board of trustees, the Rt. Rev. Dena Harrison and Dean and President Cynthia Briggs Kittredge awarded 33 diplomas to seminarians completing the Master of Divinity, MA in Religion, MA in Counseling, MA in Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care, MA in Spiritual Formation and Diploma in Anglican Studies.Lutheran Seminary Program in the Southwest (LSPS) presented certificates to graduates of their Theological Education for Emerging Ministries program.Commencement sermonGonzález honorary degree citationMontes honorary degree citationJockusch honorary degree citation In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group People, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Posted May 14, 2014 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest graduates 33, honors three Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

first_img Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Michael Hartney says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Executive Council, Members of Executive Council and staff of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society make a video greeting Nov. 16 for council member Diocese of Southwest Florida Bishop Dabney Smith who was absent from the meeting due to some health issues. The Rev. Frank Logue, council member from the Diocese of Georgia, served as videographer. Photo: Jim Simons/ via Facebook[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] During its Nov. 15-18 meeting here The Episcopal Church Executive Council laughed, cried, sang, took photos and videos, and worked with what Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry called a sense of being “joyful in Jesus Christ.”“This was a good meeting,” Curry said in a news conference after the meeting adjourned. “It was a joy-filled meeting but, joy, unlike giddy happiness, is a deeper thing. It’s not just a response to being happy in the neighborhood. Joy has to do with our joy in being in Jesus Christ. So we could be joyful and serious about the work God has given us to do.”Curry said council’s work was done “in the context of a real, deep commitment to following the way of Jesus; to take that more seriously and to go ever deeper in that and to commit evangelism in the best sense of that word, evangelism and racial reconciliation as the beginning of broader ways of human reconciliation.”Council members cried over recent attacks in Paris and Beirut and when they heard about the transformative experiences during a recent young adult pilgrimage to Ferguson, Missouri, Curry said.House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings noted that this was mainly an organizational meeting for council. The 2016-2018 has not yet begun but 19 new members, whose terms expire in 2021, joined their colleagues whose terms end in 2018 to begin their service. Council’s five joint standing committees began looking at the scope of their work for the coming triennium and examined General Convention resolutions that were referred to them for action in the coming three years, she said.Jennings told the council in her closing remarks that she appreciated what she called the “generous” spirit of the meeting and reminded the members that they had been talking about being elastic in response to change. “I do hope we will embrace the notion of being elastic,” she said.General Convention’s call for the church to focus on evangelism and racial reconciliation was front and center as council organized itself. Curry refused during the news conference to claim to be the originator of that dual call. Saying that convention “spoke with some remarkable clarity that I really believe that is of the spirit of God,” the presiding bishop said. “It wasn’t just Michael Curry. I think this was bigger than Michael Curry; this was the General Convention.”Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry listens to Executive Council debate during the group’s Nov. 15-18 meeting at the Maritime Institute Conference Center in Linthicum Heights, Maryland. Photo: Jim Simons/ via FacebookCurry added that evangelism and racial reconciliation are “intimately related,” noting that the Holy Spirit brought together disparate groups on Pentecost. Those groups eventually found a way to become a new community based on the sense that those who follow Jesus are family. “This is the gospel’s work and our General Convention claimed that work anew,” he said.Both Curry and Jennings described how they see the church’s work on evangelism and racial reconciliation proceeding. The presiding bishop said he envisions The Episcopal Church engaged in evangelism on two levels. One would be centered on planting and nurturing new churches as well as helping existing churches find ways to expand their reach into their surrounding communities. The second part of the work, he said, ought to involve nurturing as followers of Jesus “the actual Episcopalian who is sitting in the pews Sunday by Sunday” so that they are intentionally living as Christians and growing in the authentic “capacity to share and bear witness to the faith that’s in them.”“That’s the probably the longer-term impact and the one that will take more time and more intentional work,” he said.When people learn how to tell their faith stories they help build “a church that comes alive in some new ways,” Curry said, adding that those individual Episcopalians will then “have an impact in the world and in lives in ways that we could never program.”Imagine, he said, if the nearly 2 million Episcopalians did this. “We could change the world.”Jennings said racial reconciliation “is a hugely complex complicated set of issues and concerns, and there are any number of ways to dive into this.” Convention Resolution C019 charges the president and vice president of the two houses of convention “to lead, direct, and be present to assure and account for the Church’s work of racial justice and reconciliation,” Jennings noted.Those officers, plus the Rev. Michael Barlowe in his role of secretary of convention, have been meeting to discuss how to move the church forward, she said. It became clear, Jennings said, that was important to heed the advice of Deputies Vice President Byron Rushing who urged that “before we started planning, we need to listen and to listen deeply and carefully to people who are on the frontlines doing this work who can inform whatever plan or strategy we develop to engage every Episcopalian in this vital gospel-based work,” according to Jennings.The officers are arranging some hearings and developing a list of people to whom they want to listen. Jennings predicted that the group would have more information to share with the church in the first quarter of 2016.Council took a step in doing its own work around racial reconciliation during a session Nov. 16 with Brite Divinity School theology professor Keri Day. Day challenged the council to struggle with her contention that the Christian church has been and still is situated in what she called “America’s racist democratic ideal.”Many liberal Christians, as well as many liberal Americans in general, believe that the democratic ideal is a “moral blueprint” from which the country has strayed, Day said. However, she said, that the ideal is rooted in what she called white supremacy. Such supremacy is about how economic and political power accrues to whites in the United States and thus systematically excludes others.“We must tell the truth about ourselves,” Brite Divinity School theology professor Keri Day said, urging council to recognize that the Christian church has been complicit in the construction of American society. Photo: Brite Divinity SchoolThus, she said, there has always been a “real Darwinian barbarity” at the heart of the construction of American culture. Americans have failed to value all lives in their conception of democracy from the very beginning, Day said.“We must tell the truth about ourselves,” Day said, urging council to recognize that the Christian church has been complicit in the construction of American society and that “the church’s racist past is the church’s racist present.”Such truth-telling, she acknowledged, can be risky. And some council members said during their discussion with Day that they wonder about how to encourage Episcopal Church congregations to struggle with racism in U.S. culture and in themselves.Heidi Kim, Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society missioner for racial reconciliation, facilitated a discussion among council members and staff after Day’s presentation. She suggested that each person was probably reacting differently to what Day had said. For some, it was “brand new information” and for some “it’s the kind of thing we’ve been reading and doing and engaging in and been up to our ears in for a very long time, and trying to talk about it and not getting anywhere.” None of the experiences on that spectrum of reaction is right or wrong and none makes for experts or rookies.“The point of Dr. Day’s presentation today was to stir up the Holy Spirit among us,” she said.The Very Rev. Brian Baker, council member from Province VIII, said hearing Day’s presentation was an important step in having council model how The Episcopal Church could do this work. “If we’re expecting The Episcopal Church to get it right, we should be able to get it right,” he said.“I don’t think there’s anything more important for us to do than to embrace this task,” said Navajoland Bishop David Bailey. “If we do it well, it’s something we can give to the rest of the church. But until we’re willing to step forth and invest the time, the energy and the pain that’s involved with this, all the work we do in Executive Council is truly not going to matter.” Doing that work, Bailey said, “would truly be a gift to the rest of the church.”Members of Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Ministry and its Joint Standing Committee on Advocacy and Networking for Mission deliberate Nov. 17 at the Maritime Institute Conference Center in Linthicum Heights, Maryland. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceIn other action on Nov. 18, council also:* heard a report about the Oct. 8-12 Young Adult Pilgrimage to Ferguson, Missouri, from three staff members, including Kim, Chuck Wynder, Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society missioner for social justice and advocacy engagement, and Bronwyn Skov, Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society officer for youth ministries. Kim said the pilgrimage was meant to be an experience of spiritual transformation and formation rather than a conference or a training session on activism. The planners’ goal, according to Skov, was not to give the young adults a mountain-top experience but instead to create a “very uncomfortable space in which the Holy Spirit could hopefully dig in and work.” Staff was available to assist the pilgrims as they needed. As it turned out, she said, “There was a lot of white guilt in the room that many of us didn’t know how to deal with it.” Wynder said that the group went “beyond the black and white binary.” Of the 25 participants, 10 were white, 10 were black and the remaining five were Latino, Native American and Pacific Islander.Council member Warren Wong speaks to a joint meeting Nov. 17 of Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Ministry and its Joint Standing Committee on Advocacy and Networking for Mission at the Maritime Institute Conference Center in Linthicum Heights, Maryland. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service* elected new council members Warren Wong and Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny to council’s executive committee.* heard that Curry and Jennings have established an ad hoc legal review committee to assess the current legal functions as well as the legal needs of both the council and the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society. The committee comes in anticipation of the new position of chief legal officer that General Convention created by way of a rewrite of Canon 1.4. The canonical change goes into effect in January. The ad hoc committee will also develop a job description for the process.* met in executive session for about 45 minutes during the morning. In moving to go into the closed session, council member Fredrica Thompsett said the session would “consider a couple items stated in Bishop Stacy’s report, one concerning Haiti and the other concerning some staff and personnel issues.” Chief Operating Officer Bishop Stacy Sauls had spoken to the council Nov. 17 about the organization and responsibilities of the church-wide staff. His presentation was part of the typical council orientation that happens at the start of each triennium.A summary of the resolutions council passed is here.The Nov. 15-18 meeting took place at the Maritime Institute Conference Center.As the final morning session got underway Nov. 18, Barlowe told the members that a concealed audio recording device had been found on the floor of the plenary room near the table where he, Curry, Jennings and other members had been seated during the plenary sessions. He asked council members to check their tabletops and to look under their tables for any additional devices. Barlowe also said that his staff was checking to see if there were security tapes that could be reviewed to determine what happened.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms – plus the presiding bishop, the president of the House of Deputies. In addition, the vice president of the House of Deputies, secretary, chief operating officer, treasurer and chief financial officer have seat and voice but no vote.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Doug Desper says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem November 21, 2015 at 3:05 pm A recorder was found? Maybe it was someone who wasn’t trusting in the processes at the meeting; an issue raised by a few actually in the meetings themselves. Resolution (FFM 019) was to authorize housing allowances in particular amounts for 20 staff members, including the new Presiding Bishop and the Chief Operating Officer. Under the federal tax code, housing allowances allow clergy to pay less in taxes than if they take all their compensation as salary.The Committee on Finances approved the housing allowance amounts and recommended that the Exec Council do the same. However, when the resolution reached the floor, all the amounts were blacked out on the projection screen. They were also blacked out on versions distributed to reporters. A thin answer was given when objections arose to numbers being hidden. Back to the recorder. Apparently someone thought that it would be nice if transparency could be found in church business.BTW: How is moving from 815 progressing? The will of General Convention was clear on that. Between 815 and the 20 housing allowances in high rent New York the numbers might just be mind-blowing. Stewart David Wigdor says: November 23, 2015 at 11:16 am Let every word we speak be Praise and each act we do be a Blessing; for these reveal we are in the Presence of God. Executive Council November 2015 Executive Council members end four-day ‘joy-filled meeting’ Members turn to new triennium with emphasis on evangelism, reconciliation Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest November 19, 2015 at 8:10 am As the final morning session got underway Nov. 18, Barlowe told the members that a concealed audio recording device had been found on the floor of the plenary room near the table where he, Curry, Jennings and other members had been seated during the plenary sessions. What? Someone thought it necessary to plant a ‘concealed audio recording device’?You would think this was a National Security Council meeting. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 18, 2015 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (3) last_img read more