Plastic surgery patients asking to look like filtered selfies

first_imgPlastic surgery patients asking to look like filtered selfies Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter August 8, 2018 Posted: August 8, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Filters on social media apps like Snapchat or Instagram have now lead to people requesting plastic surgery to look like their filtered selves.Plastic surgeons are concerned because they’ve seen a rise in people nationwide asking to look like the filtered selfies of themselves that are created through social media apps, like Snapchat and Instagram.One click and, just like that, you have smoother skin, fuller lips, whiter teeth, bigger eyes. You can cover up any flaws in just a matter of seconds.“It makes it fun to take pictures because you have a dog face,” said Hailey Justice, Snapchat User from Alpine.“The filters definitely make you look better,” said Jake Kemper, Snapchat User from San Diego. “Sometimes it’s nice to look at Snapchat filters now and then and I don’t have acne anymore.”The filters in apps like Snapchat and Instagram, which give you instant perfection, are leaving some with the need for perfection in real life.“People want that faster, quicker, turnaround,” said Dr. Vincent Marin, Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.Plastic surgeons have seen a trend that’s called Snapchat Dysmorphia. Instead of people coming in asking to look like their favorite movie stars, they’re asking to look like the filtered, airbrushed, Snapchat version of themselves.“It’s a lot easier to do on pixels than on human DNA,” said Dr. Marin.Dr. Marin told KUSI just because it’s something you can do on your phone, doesn’t mean it’s something you can request from a plastic surgeon.“The biggest challenge with these filters is that they don’t just change one thing,” said Dr. Marin. “They make the nose smaller, the eyes bigger, the chin smaller, the skin smoother. There’s a lot of things that go into making the face look better.”In his words, that’s dangerous, unrealistic and costly.Nabil El-Ghoroury, the Executive Director of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, echoed that thought.“For some people, it can really trigger some feelings of real dissatisfaction with their body,” said El-Ghoroury.He said it’s kind of like body dysmorphia where people don’t see themselves as they are and want to enhance themselves.“It could be that they feel pressure form other people posting,” said El-Ghoroury. “It could be that they hear thoughts about themselves that they are not pretty, that they are not attractive or not attractive enough.”Too often these days, social media is pushing the feeling of inadequacy, in parents and teens alike.“I think people just need to be confident in who they are and it’s just a way of escaping how they are and I’m not a fan of that,” said Kayden Kropf.  “They should really be who God created them to be,” said Maureen Degan, Parent from Alpine. “There’s no reason to change anything on them for any reason, at all.”Dr. Marin also said some of the requests aren’t even possible, and to even get close to the Snapchat version of themselves, most people would need a complete reconstruction. That could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Most importantly, it’s dangerous. The lesson here is to embrace our imperfections. center_img , KUSI Newsroom Updated: 11:53 PM , KUSI Newsroom, last_img

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