admin

first_imgThe New York Pops orchestra will welcome a host of Broadway stars—including two-time Tony winner Sutton Foster, four-time Tony nominee and The Bridges of Madison County’s Kelli O’Hara, Tony nominee Matthew Morrison and Ryan Silverman—into the 32nd season of the company’s Carnegie Hall series, led by music director Steven Reineke. The Pops orchestra season will feature five concerts in total, kicking off on October 24. Ryan Silverman View Comments Audra McDonald Kelli O’Hara Sutton Fostercenter_img Matthew Morrison Star Files Among the seasonal features are All You Need is Love: The Music of The Beatles, a celebration of the iconic band featuring Finnish a cappella ensemble Rajaton; Kelli and Matthew: Home for the Holidays, a festive holiday concert featuring South Pacific and The Light in the Piazza co-stars Kelli O’Hara and Matthew Morrison; a solo evening with Violet star Sutton Foster; and Let’s Be Frank, a tribute to Ol’ Blue Eyes featuring Chicago vet Ryan Silverman, Tony DeSare, Storm Large and Frankie Moreno. Other season highlights will include a Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage concert by five-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald. The December 12 performance will feature classic songs from musical theater and film, along with pieces written for her by leading songwriters. Last year’s New York Pops season included performances from Broadway veterans Montego Glover, Ashley Brown, Bullets Over Broadway’s Marin Mazzie and Jason Danieley. View All (5)last_img read more

first_img Les Miserables One day more! Nothing says “Happy Graduation” like the aftermath of the June Rebellion of 1832. This clearly homemade (but very fun) Les Miz cake uses pretzel rods as barricades, and features Enjolras in what appears to be football shoulder pads. Mamma Mia! We don’t know many six-year-olds who would request a Mamma Mia! birthday cake, but hey, let’s get her started on the Broadway path early. This cake evokes the Greek Isles, and—damn it, now we’re going to have “Super Trouper” stuck in our heads for the rest of the day. Thanks a lot, Crystal. June is a time for celebration, and with Broadway fans all over the country getting married, graduating, celebrating Father’s Day, having impromptu barbecues and of course, making parole, we think you deserve a sweet treat. After hours of internet research, Broadway.com is highlighting the most impressive, silliest and weirdest Broadway-themed cake creations we could we could find. Check ’em out! Newsies How adorable is this Newsies birthday cake adorned with teeny papes? This obviously homemade treat gets an “A” for creativity—although we wish it included some edible photos of Jeremy Jordan and Corey Cott. The Book of Mormon Show your Book of Mormon-obsesed pal you care with this clever sheet cake. (If you’re thinking of sneaking into the kitchen and binge-eating the whole thing yourself, just turn those cravings off like a light switch.) View Comments The Phantom of the Opera Cakes featuring the Angel of Music are pretty basic stuff—what, you didn’t have a Phantom cake for your 12th birthday party? Don’t lie. But this treat by Toronto’s For the Love of Cake featuring a very smiley masked man really takes the, uh… You know.center_img The Lion King He’s gonna be a mighty king! What three-year-old wouldn’t want this delicious bug-covered ode to The Lion King? Pumbaa looks a little squished down there, but hey, he’s just gonna get devoured anyway. Aladdin Four-year-old Anissa is one lucky girl—she got a gorgeous Aladdin cake for her birthday! We wonder if a tap-dancing, Tony-winning James Monroe Iglehart comes out of that magic lamp when you rub it. Chicago Celebrate your release from jail with this delectable and sexy Chicago creation. It’s got everything: metal bars, legs, inexplicable poppies… This looks illegally delicious. Kinky Boots Sex isn’t in the heel—it’s in the frosting in this cake by Ron Ben-Israel. There’s only one problem: We’re not exactly sure how you slice a piece of this gorgeous dessert and eat it. Lola? Help! Wicked Although we’re not sure how much this Elphie looks like Idina Menzel, she certainly defies gravity in this three-tiered treat by Anne Arvin. Created for a Wicked fanatic’s 21st birthday, the bottom tier is decorated with flying monkeys and decorated with green icing flowers.last_img read more

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 22, 2015 Star Files Related Shows You Can’t Take It With You Rose Byrne says she takes time off—recent getaway spots include London and Paris—it just doesn’t look like it. For years, the Australian actress has delivered a non-stop string of acclaimed, diverse performances in TV (Damages) and movies (Neighbors, Bridesmaids). Now she’s on Broadway, making her debut in You Can’t Take It With You, the revival of Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman’s 1936 Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy. Byrne, headlining an all-star cast, plays Alice Sycamore, a young woman who introduces her businessman boyfriend (Fran Kranz) to her eccentric family. Below, Byrne talks about adjusting to a new environment (having a Tony-nominated beau, Bobby Cannavale, helps) and why—despite appearing in December’s film version of Annie—you shouldn’t expect her next Broadway role to be in a musical.It’s your first time on Broadway—how are you holding up?Pretty good! The first week I was pretty tired. I’m getting used to the schedule more now—we’re rehearsing a little less in the day because we’re obviously still in previews. But, yeah, you’ve just got to take it easy during the day. It takes a minute to absolutely adjust. It’s very much like an athletic kind of experience.You’re in a cast full of Broadway vets, including James Earl Jones, Kristine Nielsen and Elizabeth Ashley. How do you hold your own with those guys?They’ve just been so wonderful. Everyone is really loving and supportive. Not to sound cheesy, but from day one they were all incredibly great and patient with me. And that was really nice, so my confidence got better as we went on through rehearsal. If anything, when you’re with such pros it just makes you better because you’re trying to keep up, you know?Is it hard to not to get a little starstruck? You are sharing the stage with James Earl Jones![Laughs] I know, I know! And the funny thing is, he’s the most unassuming of anybody about his legacy. He’s so low-key. He really does not take any liberties with it all. He’s such a hard worker. He knew his lines before anyone. He was off-book from day one. He’s such a beautifully focused actor. He’s really a pleasure.Alice has one foot in the Sycamore world and in another in the real world. What’s the dynamic in your family?My family keeps me very down to earth, so I’m not ever able to take myself too seriously in terms of the business and the noise around the business. I miss my family because they’re not around, because they’re mainly in Australia. I’m pretty close to them. It’s more like, “I want you to meet everybody!” They’re really wonderful people and they’re really easy people.So nobody was making firecrackers in the basement or dancing around the living room when Bobby Cannavale met your family?No. I’m really lucky. But I have friends who are still like that—who have trouble with their family or really get worried about this or that, like what do you think of this or that person? I’ve never had that. They’re interested in everything outside of the world. They’re not isolated people. They’re easy personalities for the most part. But there’s no “Dad’s going to show them the fireworks” or whatever. [Laughs.] Did Bobby give you any advice for your Broadway debut?Absolutely! All through the rehearsal, he’d be going, “That’s normal with this and that.” That’s such a great thing to have when your man is in the same business. You can consult with each other and have those heart-to-hearts about certain things that people in the business maybe don’t quite understand.What was it like to work together on Annie?Really, really great. It’s nerve-wracking when you’re remaking a classic, and I was such a fan of that film. But at a certain point we have to jump off and jump in, and it’s actually a very different film in many ways. It’s very updated and the music is different and the characters are different. Yeah, I can’t dance like Ann Reinking, so I was very nervous about that because she’s such a legend. I’m excited. It should be a really fun movie for the family.You were in Neighbors over the summer, This is Where I Leave You just came out, Annie hits theaters this December…Do you ever take a break?[Laughs.] Oh, sure. You know, there are a lot of actors who used to work a lot and then they don’t anymore. I just think it’s such a business that there’s really no guarantee. I’m a worker. I love to work. I love my job. I’ve been lucky to have gotten some great work in the last few years. But I’m very aware of the fickleness of the business and how these things can come and go, so I think that’s part of me that doesn’t go away.With Annie under your belt, would you consider doing a Broadway musical?Oh, goodness me. I fear I wouldn’t be up to scratch for a Broadway musical [laughs]. I love them and I love going to them, but I don’t think my talent as a singer would quite cross over. I saw Cabaret and I was just blown away with what Michelle [Williams] did. I thought she was brilliant. Talk about someone who can do anything. I had no idea she had such a voice and was such a dancer. She was just fantastic and, obviously, already a brilliant actress. Saying that, I think I’d need a bunch of training to get to that level. But never say never, huh?See Rose Byrne in You Can’t Take It With You at the Longacre Theatre. View Comments Bobby Cannavalelast_img read more

first_img Love Letters Alan Alda and Candice Bergen begin their limited run in the Broadway revival of A.R. Gurney’s Love Letters on November 9, taking over from Brian Dennehy and Carol Burnett. Directed by Gregory Mosher, the pair will appear at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre through December 5. They will be followed by casts of stars in strictly limited engagements that include Anjelica Huston, Stacy Keach, Diana Rigg and Martin Sheen. Love Letters is a funny and emotional portrait about the powerful connection of love. Two friends, rebellious Melissa Gardner and straight-arrow Andrew Makepeace Ladd III have exchanged notes, cards and letters with each other for over 50 years. From second grade, through summer vacations, to college, and well into adulthood, they have spent a lifetime discussing their hopes and ambitions, dreams and disappointments, and victories and defeats. But long after the letters are done, the real question remains: Have they made the right choices or is the love of their life only a letter away? The production has also previously starred Mia Farrow. Keach and Rigg will play December 6 through January 9, 2015. Huston and Sheen will then play January 10 through February 15. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 14, 2014 View Commentslast_img read more

first_img View Comments The King and I Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on June 26, 2016 A release date is now set for the previously announced The King and I revival cast recording. The Decca Records album of the Rodgers and Hammerstein score will be available digitally on June 2 and in stores on June 9. The production, directed by Bartlett Sher, has been nominated for nine Tony Awards, including nods for Best Revival and for leads Kelli O’Hara and Ken Watanabe.The King and I is set in 1860’s Bangkok and tells the story of the unconventional and tempestuous relationship that develops between the King of Siam (Watanabe) and Anna Leonowens (O’Hara), a British schoolteacher, whom the imperious King brings to Siam to tutor his many wives and children. The musical’s score includes “Getting To Know You,” “Hello Young Lovers,” “Shall We Dance,” “I Have Dreamed” and “Something Wonderful.”In addition to O’Hara and Watanabe, the (ginormous) cast includes Tony nominee Ruthie Ann Miles as Lady Thiang, Conrad Ricamora as Lun Tha, Ashley Park as Tuptim, Edward Baker-Duly as Sir Edward Ramsey, Jon Viktor Corpuz as Prince Chulalongkom, Murphy Guyer as Captain Orton, Jake Lucas as Louis, Paul Nakauchi as Kralahome and Marc Oka as Phra Alack.last_img read more

first_imgPublic Theater View Comments Party People Tickets are now available for the New York premiere of Universes’ Party People at the Public Theater. Directed and developed by Liesl Tommy, with choreography by Millicent Johnnie, the production will run off-Broadway from November 1 through December 4. Opening night is set for November 14.Universes comprises of Mildred Ruiz-Sapp, Steven Sapp and William Ruiz aka Ninja.The award-winning ensemble known for their fusion of theater, poetry, jazz, hip-hop, politics, down home blues and Spanish boleros, makes their Public Theater premiere with a new work about the complicated legacies of the Black Panther Party and the Young Lords Org/Party.Based on dozens of interviews with members of these groundbreaking, society-changing groups, Party People imagines a present-day reunion at an art opening curated by two young counter culturalists; but the curators themselves have complex relationships with the Party members, who fought injustice and provided free food and medical care for their communities—often at the expense of the people who loved them most. Old wounds and generational divides collide in this multi-media theatrical event about the price of being a revolutionary, and what it means for those who come after.center_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 11, 2016last_img read more

first_imgGeorge Takei & Lea Salonga in ‘Allegiance'(Photo: Matthew Murphy) Allegiance View Comments Miss Allegiance, starring George Takei, Lea Salonga and Telly Leung, when it shuttered on Broadway earlier this year after 113 regular performances? Never fear, the production was filmed and will be presented by Fathom Events at movie theaters nationwide for one night only on December 13 at 7:30PM local time.The event will begin with an exclusive introduction from Takei and immediately move into the musical’s presentation. Audiences will also be treated to special behind-the-scenes footage and interviews with the cast and creators.”Allegiance has been a passion project from the beginning,” said Takei in a statement. “This deeply-moving story based on my family’s experiences could not be more timely, or poignant, considering the current political climate. So many people around the globe have never heard about this dark part of our nation’s history, and it is an honor and privilege for me to help tell this story, so that we can avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. I am deeply grateful that almost 120,000 people experienced the Broadway production during its run, an eerie reflection of the number of Japanese Americans who were directly impacted by the events depicted in Allegiance. This event—with Allegiance coming to cinema screens all around the country—will give to so many more the opportunity to experience and see this musical, which I consider my legacy.”Directed by Stafford Arima and based on Takei’s childhood experience in a Japanese-American interment camp, Allegiance features music and lyrics by Jay Kuo and a book by Marc Acito. A story of family, love and patriotism set during World War II and beyond, the show follows veteran Sam Otsuka and his sister Kei as they find themselves torn between loyalty to their family and allegiance to their country.The cast also included Katie Rose Clarke, Michael K. Lee, Christopheren Nomura and Greg Watanabe.center_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 14, 2016last_img read more

first_img We now know when two-time Tony nominee Laura Osnes and Corey Cott will bring jitterbugging to Broadway! Directed and choreographed by Hamilton’s Andy Blankenbuehler, the previously reported transfer of the Paper Mill Playhouse production of Bandstand (they’ve dropped the “The” from the title) is scheduled to officially open on April 26, 2017 at a Shubert Theatre to be announced.Osnes and Cott will both reprise their roles in the new tuner. Set in the smoke filled, swing fueled night clubs of 1945, Bandstand brings the against-all-odds story of singer/songwriter Donny Novitski (Cott) and his band of mismatched fellow WWII veterans to the stage. When a national radio contest to find America’s next big swing band offers a chance at instant fame and Hollywood fortune, Donny must whip his wise-cracking gang of jazzers into fighting shape. Teaming up with the beautiful young war widow Julia (Osnes) as their singer, they struggle to confront the lingering effects and secrets of the battlefield that threaten to tear them apart. Playing for every voiceless underdog in a world that has left them behind, they risk everything in the final live broadcast to redefine the meaning of victory. With an explosive original score and choreography inspired by the high energy swing rhythms of the era, Bandstand is a truly American story of love, loss, triumph and the everyday men and women whose personal bravery defined a nation.Osnes was Tony nominated for Bonnie and Clyde and Cinderella; additional Broadway credits include Grease, South Pacific and Anything Goes. Cott has been seen on Broadway in Gigi and Newsies; screen credits include Madam Secretary, The Intern and The Teacher.With music by Richard Oberacker, and a book and lyrics by Oberacker and Robert Taylor, the original score is strongly influenced by authentic 1940s swing music, much of which is played onstage by the characters and band members.First preview date, exact venue and further casting will be revealed later. The Paper Mill company also included Tony winner Beth Leavel, Joe Carroll, Brandon J. Ellis, James Nathan Hopkins, Geoff Packard and Joey Pero. Laura Osnes View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 17, 2017 Related Showscenter_img Laura Osnes and Corey Cott in ‘Bandstand'(Photo: Jerry Dalia) Bandstand Star Fileslast_img read more

first_imgAlex Brightman (Photos: Emilio Madrid-Kuser, Matthew Murphy, Bruce Glikas) Related Shows View Comments In the corporate world, employees leaving a job are often asked to sit through an exit interview with HR about their time at the company. That concept doesn’t exist for Broadway performers, but we love checking in with stars as they finish up a successful run. Alex Brightman originated the role of Dewey Finn in Broadway’s School of Rock and garnered a Tony nomination for his performance. Brightman will leave his pint-sized bandmates at the Winter Garden Theatre on November 6. In his Broadway.com Exit Interview, Brightman shares why he’s leaving, what he’ll miss and how the role has changed him.How did you feel when you first got this job?This was the phone call that you don’t even dream about. I stood on 23rd Street and Seventh Avenue. The phone to my ear. My eyes wide and beginning to water. I have had great successes over my short career, but this was just something that didn’t seem tangible until it did. There are billions of people in the world and only one of them, in that moment, gets to star in Andrew Lloyd Webber’s brand new Broadway musical. It’s still, to this day, indescribable. How do you feel now that you’re leaving?As I write this, I have 13 performances left. We have done almost 400 performances, not including the workshop performances, and this has been a gigantic part of my life. My heart is full of School of Rock, and it will continue to be full for a long time because of it. As the end of this road comes closer, I feel proud and happy. I don’t feel sad to be leaving. I’m thrilled to move on, knowing that I have done everything I could have ever done with this experience. On my final night in the show, there will be tears and frivolity and laughter. I can’t wait to pass the torch to the new class. They’re going to have a blast.What are three words you would use to describe your experience?Rip-roaring. Hard-won. Transformative.What was the easiest thing about this job?Showing up every day knowing that I was going to get to play pretend with my friends in one of the best playgrounds I have ever had the pleasure to help build.What was the hardest thing?Maintenance! Before this show, I was pretty sure that I was invincible, but I am thrilled to have been humbled by this monster of a role. This show/role is a full-time job. I wake up thinking about my voice and body. I go to sleep thinking about my voice and body. I am ready to be a little less selfish and give myself a bit of a break. The other hardest thing was saying goodbye to the wonderful young performers who graduated from the show. I would write them a little speech/poem/etc. after curtain call, and that never got easier. They are wonderful people and I will miss them dearly.What was the highlight of your time at this job?The one true highlight (and trust me, there are thousands) for me was simply being able to create a performance that was supremely me. I have never had so much encouragement to play and think and invent in the exact way I would want to play and think and invent. The other highlight I should mention was going to and performing at the Tony Awards. I had never been before, and it was quite the experience that I will never forget.What skills do you think are required for future job applicants?Each Dewey is going to be different. That’s the beauty of the role. But the prerequisites are this in no particular order: stamina, ethics, absurdity, diligence, health and the willingness to leave part of yourself on stage every single night.What advice would you give to future employees in your job position?Bring your baggage in the door with you. This is a role that requires raw-nerve feelings and smash-cut emotions. If I have a bad day, I bring some of it to my performance that evening. Passion swings both ways and Dewey has the opportunity to access both nightly. My other piece of advice is to really get to know the young performers. The show hinges on the relationship between Dewey and the students. It’s important to realize that these “kids” are people. They are interesting human beings with amazing stories and backgrounds. It’s vital to have a friendship with them. It shows on stage.How do you think you’ve grown?Growing is incremental and relative. Through this experience, I have learned how to take care of myself better than ever. And I mean that on all levels. I have always been a “yes” man. I worried that the pressure and weight of this role would make me less of one. But I am proud to say that I have grown into someone who knows his limits. I am still a “yes” man. But I am also a smarter “yes” man. And having the great opportunity to carry and lead a show has given me the tools to do it again and again and again. I’m up for that task, and now I know that with confidence.Why are you leaving?I am leaving because I want a rich and varied career, and I can only do that if I continue to be artistically nomadic. I’m working on a ton of new things (writing, acting, etc.) and I can’t wait to devote some more attention to those projects. It’s important to risk things. I love not knowing what’s in front of me.What will you miss the most? I will miss it all. This has been the most fun I have had in any show I have ever done…ever. I will miss the young performers. They make me better. I will miss my friends. They make me better. I will miss the audiences. They make me better. I will miss this experience. It has enlightened me. And it has made me better.center_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 20, 2019 School of Rock – The Musicallast_img read more

first_img Bearded irises: multiply by dividing. Photo: UGA Georgia Experiment Station Research & Education Garden Walter Reeves On this week’s “Gardening in Georgia,” host Walter Reeves shows how to dig, separate and replant irises and takes time to show some of his favorite “toys” — digging tools.The show will be aired on Wednesday, July 18, at 7:30 p.m. on Georgia Public Television. If you miss that show, it will be rebroadcast on Saturday, July 21, at 12:30 p.m.Reeves shows how simple it is to lift the clump of irises with a spading fork, then slice the roots apart to leave a healthy fan of leaves on each section.Favorite New ‘Toy’He uses the opportunity, too, to show one of his new “toys,” a U-Bar digger from Lee Valley Tools. As he works, he describes the flowers of different irises: bearded, Dutch, Japanese and others. He finishes his job by replanting the divided irises in a well-drained bed that gets full sun.center_img Reeves demonstrates other digging tools, too, including the round-point flat and trenching shovel, spading fork and others. And he reveals how to choose the best tool for the job at hand.Guest Dan Suiter, an entomologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, describes the life cycle of the smoky brown cockroach (Periplaneta fuliginosa). It often lives in tree hollows in your landscape. Suiter shows Reeves how to use a gel bait to control these nasty, large pests.Sack Lunches in TreesUGA entomologist Beverly Sparks shows that the spindle-shaped sacks hanging on your trees probably contain bagworms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis). These caterpillars continuously build the bag, using it for shelter as they move about the plant, stripping it of its leaves.Looking for a low-maintenance annual that’s a nonstop bloomer for the landscape, planter or hanging basket? The New Wonder Blue Fan Flower (Scaevola aemula ‘New Wonder’) may be the answer. UGA horticulturist Jim Midcap describes this 1997 Georgia Gold Medal Winner.”Gardening in Georgia” airs every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 12:30 p.m. on GPTV. The show is produced specifically for Georgia gardeners by the UGA CAES and GPTV. To learn more, visit the show’s Web site. UGA CAES File Photolast_img read more