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first_imgDesert Daze will celebrate its 7th-annual event from October 12th to 14th. Today, the festival announced its “Phase One Transmission” of confirmed artists led by headliner Tame Impala. Other artists include Mercury Rev performing Deserter’s Songs to celebrate its 20th anniversary, Warpaint, Ty Segall & White Fence, Malcolm Mooney of Can, Connan Mockasin, and Chelsea Wolfe.This year, notably, Desert Daze will be heading to a new venue, Lake Perris, which is nestled between the San Jacinto and San Bernardino mountains in Moreno Valley, roughly 1.5 hours southeast of Los Angeles. In addition to RV and tent camping, the new site features access to state park facilities including real showers and restrooms, RV power and water hookups, gorgeous scenery, and “an Italian style beach club with lounging, swimming, sunbathing and boat rides.”Tame Impala, the massively popular Australian psych-rock act, made news recently when they were announced as a headliner for this year’s Pitchfork Music Festival. The group last performed in the United States—well, they last performed at all—when the band headlined the Panorama Music Festival in New York City last July. The Australian rockers’ set marked only their second U.S. date of the year, which made sense considering they planned to take a bit of a hiatus in 2017.General Admission and VIP pass options for Desert Daze go on sale Friday, March 30th at 10 a.m. (PST) with “Visitor” (General Admission passes) starting at $249. Camping and lodging experiences will be available via Eventbrite.For more information, head to the festival website.You can see a full list of Desert Daze “Phase One Transmission” Artists below:DESERT DAZE 2018 LINEUPPhase One Transmission:Tame ImpalaMercury Rev Perform Deserter’s SongsWarpaintTy Segall & White FenceChelsea WolfeMalcolm Mooney of CanConnan MockasinPreoccupationsA Place To Bury StrangersKing Khan & The ShrinesShannon & The ClamsPondKevin MorbyDakhabrakhaEarthlessKikagaku MoyoAll Them WitchesThe Holydrug CoupleEx-CultTrue WidowCut WormsJJUUJJUUHere Lies ManMary LattimoreTropa MagicaGladys LazerCat ScanView Full ‘Phase One Transmission’last_img read more

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 22, 2015 Star Files Related Shows You Can’t Take It With You Rose Byrne says she takes time off—recent getaway spots include London and Paris—it just doesn’t look like it. For years, the Australian actress has delivered a non-stop string of acclaimed, diverse performances in TV (Damages) and movies (Neighbors, Bridesmaids). Now she’s on Broadway, making her debut in You Can’t Take It With You, the revival of Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman’s 1936 Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy. Byrne, headlining an all-star cast, plays Alice Sycamore, a young woman who introduces her businessman boyfriend (Fran Kranz) to her eccentric family. Below, Byrne talks about adjusting to a new environment (having a Tony-nominated beau, Bobby Cannavale, helps) and why—despite appearing in December’s film version of Annie—you shouldn’t expect her next Broadway role to be in a musical.It’s your first time on Broadway—how are you holding up?Pretty good! The first week I was pretty tired. I’m getting used to the schedule more now—we’re rehearsing a little less in the day because we’re obviously still in previews. But, yeah, you’ve just got to take it easy during the day. It takes a minute to absolutely adjust. It’s very much like an athletic kind of experience.You’re in a cast full of Broadway vets, including James Earl Jones, Kristine Nielsen and Elizabeth Ashley. How do you hold your own with those guys?They’ve just been so wonderful. Everyone is really loving and supportive. Not to sound cheesy, but from day one they were all incredibly great and patient with me. And that was really nice, so my confidence got better as we went on through rehearsal. If anything, when you’re with such pros it just makes you better because you’re trying to keep up, you know?Is it hard to not to get a little starstruck? You are sharing the stage with James Earl Jones![Laughs] I know, I know! And the funny thing is, he’s the most unassuming of anybody about his legacy. He’s so low-key. He really does not take any liberties with it all. He’s such a hard worker. He knew his lines before anyone. He was off-book from day one. He’s such a beautifully focused actor. He’s really a pleasure.Alice has one foot in the Sycamore world and in another in the real world. What’s the dynamic in your family?My family keeps me very down to earth, so I’m not ever able to take myself too seriously in terms of the business and the noise around the business. I miss my family because they’re not around, because they’re mainly in Australia. I’m pretty close to them. It’s more like, “I want you to meet everybody!” They’re really wonderful people and they’re really easy people.So nobody was making firecrackers in the basement or dancing around the living room when Bobby Cannavale met your family?No. I’m really lucky. But I have friends who are still like that—who have trouble with their family or really get worried about this or that, like what do you think of this or that person? I’ve never had that. They’re interested in everything outside of the world. They’re not isolated people. They’re easy personalities for the most part. But there’s no “Dad’s going to show them the fireworks” or whatever. [Laughs.] Did Bobby give you any advice for your Broadway debut?Absolutely! All through the rehearsal, he’d be going, “That’s normal with this and that.” That’s such a great thing to have when your man is in the same business. You can consult with each other and have those heart-to-hearts about certain things that people in the business maybe don’t quite understand.What was it like to work together on Annie?Really, really great. It’s nerve-wracking when you’re remaking a classic, and I was such a fan of that film. But at a certain point we have to jump off and jump in, and it’s actually a very different film in many ways. It’s very updated and the music is different and the characters are different. Yeah, I can’t dance like Ann Reinking, so I was very nervous about that because she’s such a legend. I’m excited. It should be a really fun movie for the family.You were in Neighbors over the summer, This is Where I Leave You just came out, Annie hits theaters this December…Do you ever take a break?[Laughs.] Oh, sure. You know, there are a lot of actors who used to work a lot and then they don’t anymore. I just think it’s such a business that there’s really no guarantee. I’m a worker. I love to work. I love my job. I’ve been lucky to have gotten some great work in the last few years. But I’m very aware of the fickleness of the business and how these things can come and go, so I think that’s part of me that doesn’t go away.With Annie under your belt, would you consider doing a Broadway musical?Oh, goodness me. I fear I wouldn’t be up to scratch for a Broadway musical [laughs]. I love them and I love going to them, but I don’t think my talent as a singer would quite cross over. I saw Cabaret and I was just blown away with what Michelle [Williams] did. I thought she was brilliant. Talk about someone who can do anything. I had no idea she had such a voice and was such a dancer. She was just fantastic and, obviously, already a brilliant actress. Saying that, I think I’d need a bunch of training to get to that level. But never say never, huh?See Rose Byrne in You Can’t Take It With You at the Longacre Theatre. View Comments Bobby Cannavalelast_img read more

first_imgBetween the low rolling hills of the Piedmont and the steep slopes of the Blue Ridge Escarpment lies the isolated mountain range of the South Mountains in North Carolina, a range of mountains often forgotten to its bigger neighbors to the north and west. The South Mountains include many clear mountain streams, beautiful waterfalls, scenic vistas, and elevations that rise up to 3,000 ft.  And almost half of the range is protected from development as either State Park or Game Lands, encompassing nearly 40,000 acres of the highest peaks and headwaters of the mountain range.I have been running in South Mountains State Park for years. Due to its relatively close proximity to my work and home in the Catawba Valley, I have been a frequent user of the state park and its near 40 mile trail system in the park’s eastern side. That being said though, a recent western addition to the park has nearly brought the park’s boundaries to my doorstep and countless others’ in nearby Morganton, N.C. Nearly all of this land is just a short drive of 10-15 minutes from Morganton, unlike the current entrance which is almost 30-40 minutes away. The only problem with this, though, is that there is currently limited access into this section of the park and little to no trails in its near 9,000 acres, which is almost half of the park’s size.Every year in January I am reminded of this lack of recreational opportunity in the western half of the South Mountains when I join fellow adventurers and friends for the running of the Sultan 50K, which is a joyous “fun run” celebration of birthdays including red velvet cake and fuzzy crowns. The run starts in the western end of the park along Roper Hollow Road and continues into the eastern end of the park and its developed trail system. This road straddles the boundary of the State Park and the State Game Lands and follows it for nearly 10 extremely scenic miles. In my opinion, this gravel/dirt road might be the most scenic of all paths in the South Mountains. It is also the main gateway to explore the western end of the park and the surrounding Game Lands.After this year’s running of the Sultan 50K, I decided to return to Roper Hollow Road with some friends and explore more of what the area had to offer. I had noticed many paths leading into the Game Lands off the road during the Sultan 50K and we decided to explore those first. To our surprise, we soon entered into a ridgeline wildlife field and witnessed one of the most spectacular views of the Blue Ridge I had ever seen (along with a rare bobcat sighting). Not only could we see the surrounding peaks of the South Mountains, but the view stretched from the highest ridges of the Hickory Nut Gorge all the way past the northernmost peak of the towering Black Mountain Range. The Game Lands are riddled with many of these trails, but there is currently no public map of where they all lead. This, coupled with the fact that hunters do frequent the area, has probably kept curious adventurers from exploring this gem of land, that offers much more recreational opportunity other than just hunting.After being in awe of the views we had just experienced, our group next set our sights onto Buzzards Roost, the highest peak within South Mountains State Park, which sits at just under 3,000 ft in elevation and towers 1,900 ft above the surrounding valley. Surprisingly, there is no trail to this iconic peak of the South Mountains.   Therefore, it was time for some bushwhacking. After a short mile and half bushwhack to the summit, we headed just down slope to a cliff and we were rewarded with another breathtaking view of the mountains of North Carolina. Our view now stretched from the Craggies in the south all the way past Grandfather Mountain in the north. The view also afforded us a look right into the heart of the Linville Gorge. The lack of a trail to this location just seemed odd to me.As we returned from our wanderlust into the western end of the South Mountains, I was perplexed by the lack of recreational opportunity that lied there, but also excited to explore it even more. I have spoken with the rangers of the park on many occasions about the lack of recreation on the western side and they too expressed my desire to open the western end up with more trails and other recreational opportunities, but currently there is a lack of allocated funding to make that happen. It would be great to see a ground swell of support for the further development of recreational opportunities in the western end of the park, but I doubt many folks even realize the potential that lies within its borders. Maybe with the mass support of the outdoor community, we can all see the untapped potential of the South Mountains become a reality to more than just the ambitious adventurer.last_img read more

first_imgBy Master Sgt. Clifton McDonald/U.S. Southern Command Public Affairs November 09, 2016 The workshop, held at the “27 de febrero” Naval Base, was sponsored by SOUTHCOM and is part of the Caribbean nation’s six-month long NCO development course. SOUTHCOM NCOs facilitated the event, the second NCO Leadership Workshop held for the Dominican Republic Armed Forces. The workshop is part of the Dominican Republic’s professional NCO course and was attended by 48 NCOs from all branches of the Dominican Armed Forces, including 23 Army, 13 Navy, and 12 Air Force members. The main focus of the workshop was to work with partner-nation NCOs to enhance their basic leadership skills. The students represented a diverse educational background. Many hold college degrees, while others had earned a law degree. The goal of the program is to empower the NCOs with the knowledge and confidence necessary to become effective leaders in their respective units. The workshop began with Master Sgt. Zajira Alleyne, of the Inter-American Air Forces Academy, facilitating a discussion on identifying different personality types. During the discussion, Master Sgt. Alleyne used the “4-Lenses Assessment” tool by the Myers Briggs Personality Type Indicator. NCOs were challenged to acknowledge their own personal strengths and weaknesses. Most participants agreed with the results of the assessment, recognizing their own personality types. Some students were eager to share this assessment with their home units upon their return. Participants were also challenged with a three-word question: “What is leadership?” The question steered the rest of the discussions throughout the event, serving to generate numerous ideas and discussions about their own roles as leaders. SOUTHCOM’s Army Sgt. 1st Class Rulberto Ojendismiranda and U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Southern’s Gunnery Sgt. Juan Morales led a session to introducestudents to a leadership model used by the U.S. Army that aligns leader development to a set of characteristics called attributes and competencies. Attributes such as character, presence, and intellect are competencies to be developed and skills to be learned and enhanced. Dominican Army Lieutenant Colonel Juan Miguel Oviedo Montero believes the leadership workshop helps bridge the gap between NCOs and officers. Although NCOs don’t yet hold any leadership positions, there are plans to incorporate them into positions of leadership at the company, battalion, and brigade levels in the near future. “That’s why it’s imperative to incorporate leadership training to build the confidence and knowledge the Dominican Republic NCOs need to advise officers and lead personnel,” he said. Lt. Col Oviedo said he has seen an improvement in the NCOs who have been through the first Leadership Workshop and he is looking forward to future training workshops with SOUTHCOM.last_img read more

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York For years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been frustrated in its efforts to pursue hundreds of cases of water pollution—repeatedly tied up in legal fights about exactly what bodies of water it has the authority to monitor and protect. Efforts in Congress to clarify the EPA’s powers have been defeated. And two Supreme Court decisions have done little to decide the question.Most recently, in April, the EPA itself declared what waters were subject to its oversight—developing a joint rule with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that sought to end the debate and empower the EPA to press hundreds of enforcements actions against alleged polluters across the country.The new rule, for instance, explicitly defines several terms—tributary, floodplain and wetland—and makes clear that those waters are subject to its authority.But the EPA’s effort has been met with immense opposition from farmers who say the agency is overreaching. An expansive online campaign organized and financed by the American Farm Bureau Federation has asserted that the new rule will give the EPA jurisdiction over farmers’ irrigation ditches, watering ponds and even puddles of rain.The American Farm Bureau Federation’s president, Bob Stallman, said the proposed rule was the “the biggest federal land grab—in terms of power over land use—that we’ve seen to date.”In an effort to address the concerns of farmers, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy in recent weeks has been touring states in the Midwest.“There are issues we need to discuss and clarify to get this rule right,” she said. “We have important work to do. All the silly contentions being brought up—that we intend to regulate dry ground or stock ponds or mud puddles after a rain—all that does is get in the way of our being able to have those serious discussions.”The Clean Water Act of 1972 authorized the EPA to protect the “waters of the United States” from dangerous and or illegal pollution. But that term has been the subject of controversy and dispute virtually from the time the act was signed into law. Regulators and industry representatives are generally in agreement that the law applies to some of the nation’s larger rivers. At issue, however, are the streams that flow intermittently and the wetlands adjacent to these streams that dry up during the summer.Legal fights over those streams and wetlands, current and former EPA officials say, have cost the agency time, money and effectiveness in the face of real environmental threats. Indeed, in recent years the EPA has allowed hundreds of cases of water pollution to go unpunished because it currently lacks the confidence that it can prevail in court.Granta Nakayama, who served as the Assistant Administrator for the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance at the EPA until 2009, found that between July 2006 and March 2008 the agency had decided not to pursue formal enforcement in 304 cases because of jurisdictional uncertainty.In 2008, in an internal memo, Nakayama wrote that the uncertainty “results in delays in enforcement and increases the resources needed to bring enforcement cases.”And so in 2007, when an oil company discharged thousands of gallons of crude oil into Edwards Creek in Titus County, Texas, the EPA did not issue a fine, pursue legal action or even require clean up. Similarly, after a farming operation dumped manure into tributaries that fed Lake Blackshear in Georgia, the EPA did not seek to hold the polluting company responsible—despite the fact that tests showed unsafe levels of bacteria and viruses in the lake, which was regularly used for waterskiing and other recreation.“The proposed rule will improve the process for making jurisdictional determinations for the Clean Water Act by minimizing delays and costs, and will improve the predictability and consistency of the permit and enforcement process for landowners,” an EPA spokesperson said.The EPA expects that improving efficiency in jurisdictional determinations will also save the businesses that they regulate time and money.“Protecting water is important to the long-term health of the economy,” the EPA spokesperson said. “Streams and wetlands are economic drivers because of their role in fishing, hunting, agriculture, recreation, energy, and manufacturing.”Two Supreme Court decisions in the last 15 years have been the cause of much of the uncertainty.In a 5-4 ruling in 2001, the Court held that the Army Corps of Engineers could not require permits for waters based on their use as a habitat by migratory birds. The Court ruling also included language that seemed to assert that only wetlands with a “significant nexus” to traditional navigable waterways would be protected under the Clean Water Act. The Court did not make clear the meaning of the term “significant nexus.”And in 2006, the Court, asked to determine whether a wetland needed to be adjacent to a traditional navigable waterway in order to be protected, wound up split, and reached no majority decision.By the EPA’s own estimates, 2 million stream miles outside of Alaska are regarded as “intermittent,” and 20 percent of roughly 110 million acres of wetlands are considered “isolated.” As a result of the inability of the government to clarify the EPA’s jurisdiction over the last 15 years, these water bodies are currently unprotected.“At some level this is a very frustrating debate to be having because water is all connected at some level,” said Jon Devine, a senior attorney in the water program at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “What the Supreme Court’s decisions do is throw into significant doubt what is protected.”As a result, in cases where a polluted waterway isn’t clearly under the EPA’s jurisdiction, the agency has sometimes spent thousands of dollars to model water flow and conduct studies to show that it is hydrologically connected to larger water bodies that are protected.“It just causes an incredible waste of resources and rewards those who don’t really worry about compliance and punishes those who do,” said Nakayama, now an environmental lawyer at Kirkland & Ellis in Washington.In past years, federal legislators have tried to introduce bills that address the ambiguity in the Clean Water Act’s language, but none have passed both the House and Senate.In 2011, when Congress was considering a bill that made many of the changes that EPA’s current rule would, the American Farm Bureau Federation, as part of the Waters Advocacy Coalition, used a similar media strategy to kill the bill. The Coalition was made up of different industry groups that would be affected by the bill including mining associations and homebuilders.The New York Times reported than an unnamed member of the Coalition said, “The game plan is to emphasize the scary possibilities. If you can get Glenn Beck to say that government storm troopers are going to invade your property, farmers in the Midwest will light up their congressmen’s switchboards.”This time around, the pushback by farmers and others—called the “Ditch the Rule” campaign—has mainly taken place online. The Farm Bureau organization has created a separate website for the campaign and created shareable videos and infographics. The organization has also been effective in recruiting state farming associations to join the campaign. It has resulted in a blitz of social media posts and a steady stream of local coverage often favoring the farmers’ point of view.“The campaign has energized our grassroots to participate,” said Don Parrish, senior director of regulatory relations at the American Farm Bureau Federation. Although the campaign does not have a large amount of money flowing into it, Parrish said it has really “struck a chord.”Lisa Garcia, a former administrator of environmental justice at the EPA, said the effort by the federation is chiefly one of misinformation.“The rule is not adding or expanding the scope of waters historically protected,” said Garcia, who is currently at Earth Justice, an environmental non-profit organization. She said the opposition she has seen fits “this pattern of just completely fighting against any new regulation.”Parrish disagrees. He said that the tensions that are playing out are because “the EPA is trying to create regulations that do an end run around the Supreme Court and Congress.”“[The EPA is] really reaching into areas that Congress clearly didn’t want the EPA to regulate. They did not intend to put EPA in the land use business,” he said.For more on the challenges facing the Clean Water Act, read our work on the water woes facing residents living close to gas drilling and our series on the BP oil spill disaster.last_img read more

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York President Obama issued a solemn address to the nation Wednesday in the wake of the beheading of American journalist James Foley, praising his life and work and vowing continued military action in Iraq to protect US interests and “extract this cancer” of the Islamic State, the militant group who murdered him.“Jim was taken from us in an act of violence that shocks the whole world,” said Obama. “We are all heartbroken at their loss and join them in honoring Jim in all that he did. “Jim Foley’s life stands in stark contrast with his killers,” he continued. “They have rampaged across cities and villages killing innocent, unarmed civilians in cowardly acts of violence. They abduct women and children and subject them to torture and rape and slavery. They have murdered Muslims—both Sunni and Shia—by the thousands. They target Christians and religious minorities, driving them from their homes, murdering them when they can for no other reason than they practice a different religion. They declared their ambition to commit genocide against an ancient people.”“ISIL speaks for no religion,” said Obama. “Their victims are overwhelmingly Muslim, and no faith teaches people to massacre innocents. No just God would stand for what they did yesterday, and for what they do every single day. ISIL has no ideology of any value to human beings. Their ideology is bankrupt… People like this ultimately fail.”“The United States of America will continue to do what we must do to protect our people. We will be vigilant and we will be relentless,” he added, calling upon other nations to join the fight against the group. “There has to be a common effort to extract this cancer, so that it does not spread.“One thing we can all agree on is that a group like ISIL has no place in the 21st century.”Obama’s statements were the first official confirmation of authenticity of a video posted on YouTube Tuesday depicting Foley’s beheading. The 40-year-old had been missing since Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 22, 2012, when the car he was traveling in toward the Turkish border in northern Syria was stopped by four armed men. He had been reporting from the Middle East for the five years prior, and leading up to his disappearance had spent several weeks reporting inside Syria. Until Tuesday there had been no direct contact with Foley, nor communication with his kidnappers or ransom demand, wrote Phil Balboni, president and CEO of online news outlet GlobalPost, where Foley was a contributor, in a note to staff on the year anniversary of his taking. Besides the Syrian civil war, the freelance photojournalist from New Hampshire had reported on conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya, where he was once held captive for 44 days.He appeared dressed in orange, on his knees with his hands bound behind his back in the gruesome five-minute video segment titled “A Message To America.” His murderer stood by his side wearing ISIS’ signature all-black cloaks and mask, a holstered gun slung across his shoulder and grasping a large blade. Following forced anti-American remarks from Foley, his killer made threats against the United States, naming Obama, and then beheaded Foley before grabbing the neck of what the video purported to be Steven Soltoff, a TIME magazine contributor who disappeared in the region earlier this month. Soltoff is also kneeling in the sand, his hands bound. The masked man then warns Obama that his fate rests in Obama’s decision about continuing US airstrikes against the group.ISIS, short for the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria—also known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and most recently, the Islamic State—proclaimed the creation of a caliphate, or Islamic state, across parts of western Iraq and northern Syria in June. Its leader, or caliph, is Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, a militant once in US custody but released.James Foley, Tripoli (Libya) airport, August 2011. (Photo by Jonathan Pedneault, courtesy of FreeJamesFoley.org and “Find James Foley” Facebook page)American warplanes have been targeting the group and bombing its positions in the region since it began slaughtering religious minorities in the region in the beginning of August. The group has swept into towns and villages demanding its residents convert to Islam, pay a fine, or be killed, according to local religious leaders, Iraqi government officials, humanitarian workers and members of those groups being persecuted—which includes Muslims, Christians and the followers of an ancient religious order called the Yazidis.Hundreds of thousands have been forced to abandon their homes in the region and tens of thousands had sought refuge on a nearby mountain range, which led to a humanitarian crisis due to extreme heat, the shortage of water and food and medicine and lack of shelter. The United States, Britain and several other countries have been dropping food and water for the past two weeks and arming Kurdish fighters to help repel ISIS. The Kurds have also successfully escorted tens of thousands to relative safety in makeshift refugee camps. Obama recently ruled out a US-led evacuation of Yazidis still stuck on the mountain, citing an assessment by about 20 US special forces deployed there that those displaced no longer faced an imminent threat. That decision and assessment has been widely criticized, as tens of thousands of Yazidis reportedly still remain in dire straits trapped on the south side of the mountain range. There have been reports of Christian children being beheaded and mass executions with people being buried alive. ISIS has also reportedly abducted more than 1,000 Yazidi women, according to media reports from the conflict, who are feared to have become sex slaves and made to wed ISIS fighters.An outpouring of support for Foley and his family and resounding condemnation against his barbaric mutilation continued to flood social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter Wednesday, with the Committee to Protect Journalists’ Chairman Sandra Mims Rowe issuing the following statement:“The barbaric murder of journalist James Foley, kidnapped in Syria and held almost two years, sickens all decent people. Foley went to Syria to show the plight of the Syrian people, to bear witness to their fight, and in so doing to fight for press freedom. Our hearts go out to his family, who had dedicated themselves to finding and freeing Jim.”Foley’s mom Diane honored her son in a post on the Facebook page “Find James Foley.”“We have never been prouder of our son Jim,” she wrote. “He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people. We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world.“We thank Jim for all the joy he gave us,” she added. “He was an extraordinary son, brother, journalist and person. Please respect our privacy in the days ahead as we mourn and cherish Jim.”Two journalists with Long Island ties have also been victims of the Syrian conflict: Matthew Schrier, a Syosset native and photojournalist, escaped from ISIS rivals Nusa Front last summer after the group kidnapped him and Marie Colvin, an East Norwich native, was killed in 2012 while covering the Syrian civil war for The Sunday Times in London.James Foley addresses students at Medill in 2011:last_img read more

first_imgThe topic of financial literacy seems to be a never ending discussion about what needs to be done, how to do it and who is responsible for getting it done.Aside from the fact that there are adult individuals who lack a basic understanding of simple financial transactions, what is more frightening is that an even greater number of our young people, the adults of tomorrow, also lack the knowledge of how to handle their finances.This problem of educating people about ways to save, how to balance a checkbook, the difference between debit and credit cards, getting a car loan, applying for a student loan and the myriad of other financial decisions one needs to make in a lifetime, is not a new one. It is a problem that has not been limited to a specific generation but has actually been passed down from one to another.Some may argue that this is a problem that needs to be addressed in the schools. Recently in one state they enacted a law requiring students pass a civics test before graduating from high school. I believe that is an excellent idea. Everyone should have the basic knowledge of the history of our country as well as the state in which they live. They should know about the different forms of government, how people are elected to office and the importance of voting. It’s sad when many people do not know the name of the Vice President.So if students must learn civics, why not also require them to be instructed on basic financial tools prior to graduation? There are so many ways financial education can be taught. A one day class for graduating seniors or ten hours set aside during a school year with each hour devoted to a different financial subject. The instructor could be a teacher or an individual drawn from the financial community. Knowing how to save and borrow is perhaps even more important than knowing who is the Vice President.Financial institutions also need to be involved. The role of educating customers does not end at telling them what products are available. It must extend to finding out what is best for each customer, explaining how each product works and advising them what best suits their needs.Such an effort will of course cost time and money on the part of financial institutions. Staff will need to be trained not only in product offering but also how to explain to the customer what the product is, what it does and how customers can benefit from using it.Financial institutions for years have scheduledseminars, institutional classes and learning events for their customers only to have attendance so low that they stopped holding them. In spite of that setback, financial institutions must take the lead to create the opportunities that will result in a better educated population.One suggestion has been when the customer asks for a product, be it a simple account or a complicated loan, the financial institution provide the required education of that product at the point of sale. Again, the time and money factor comes into play but no one can argue the benefits gained by having an educated customer. That little extra time to fully explain, ask questions and give good direction will result in goodwill, understanding and trust as well as repeat business.Providing written or on-line material about products and services may help in some way but no one can argue the success of person to person instruction. While an institution may provide such material, real success will only be achieved by going above and beyond the written word.So where does the responsibility lie for financial education? Is it with government or the private sector? To be fair, let’s say the responsibility lies with both sectors. But if we wait for government to act, it may not get done any time soon if ever. That leaves it up to the financial institutions. By taking the lead in this effort, they and their customers will benefit from what they do resulting in a better educated population.There are many ways to go about achieving financial literacy success. It’s a challenge but one that all financial institutions must accept and work towards. Working with their national and state trade associations, financial institutions should consider the following:Contact your Governor and state legislators and encourage them to require financial education in the class room and that it is made a prerequisite to graduation.Contact the schools in the communities you serve and offer to send your staff to discuss and educate them about financial services.Make certain all your officers, directors and employees are aware of all products offered and are able to talk about the value they provide to the customer.Develop a program within your financial institution which would require your staff to educate the customer about the specific service they are requesting.On your web site encourage customers to come in at their convenience to learn how your products can help them.Education is the key to financial literacy. Everyone accepting responsibility to do all they can towards that education is the solution.The more everyone knows, the better their lives will be. 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Michael Fryzel Michael Fryzel is the former Chairman of the National Credit Union Administration and is now a financial services consultant and government affairs attorney in Chicago. He can be reached at … Detailslast_img read more

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer sent the message that plans for an interest rate increase this year are still on, during the Kansas City Federal Reserve’s annual retreat in Jackson Hole, Wyo.Fed Chair Janet Yellen did not attend this year’s retreat.During a panel on inflation dynamics, Fischer said, “There is good reason to believe that inflation will move higher as the forces holding down inflation dissipate further.” Observers told Bloomberg they believe his comments leave the possibility of a rate increase this month open – when the Federal Open Market Committee meets in Washington on Sept. 16-17.NAFCU Chief Economist and Director of Research Curt Long said, “It seems clear that the Fed is eyeing 2015 for liftoff, but whether that is September or December remains unclear. To that end, the August employment report will be watched closely, but market behavior between now and mid-September is probably more important.” continue reading »last_img read more

first_img Share 46 Views   no discussions Share Share Tweetcenter_img Sharing is caring! NewsRegional Three killed in riot over increased electricity rates in Guyana by: – July 20, 2012 Pandemonium in Guyana mining town as police and protesters clash.GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Friday July 20, 2012 – The atmosphere remains tense in the Guyana mining town of Linden following a violent clash between police and protesters on Wednesday evening that left three dead and many injured.The carnage came amidst protests stemming from the government’s introduction of higher electricity rates in the town of about 30,000 people. Residents are contending they cannot afford the hike at this time, and some businesses temporarily shut down in sympathy.Protesters used old vehicles and other debris to block the Wismar-Mackenzie Bridge, a major artery to the mining interior, from mid-morning on Wednesday until they clashed with police around 6:00pm.Police resorted to firing rubber pellets at the demonstrators after tear gas failed to disperse a group that had occupied the bridge all day.Eyewitnesses said the tear gas volleys fell short of the crowd, since they were fired from the vicinity of the Linden Hospital Complex, and protesters retaliated by pelting the police with bottles. At least six persons were said to have been seriously injured in the melee, while several more escaped with minor injuries.Regional Administrative Chairman Sharma Solomon said on Wednesday night that three males were killed including a handicapped child.Sharma accused the police of using both live rounds and rubber pellets on the protesters and described the situation in Linden Wednesday evening as “pandemonium.”“Dozens of persons have been injured,” he declared.There were also reports of several buildings on fire including the General Office which houses the offices of Linden Electricity Company CEO Horace James and the finance area where Lindeners usually pay their electricity bills.Mackenzie, on the eastern bank of the Demerara River, was reportedly plunged into a blackout, but the cause is not clear. The Linden Utility Cooperatives Society Limited (LUSCL) turned off its supply to residents of Wismar on the western side of the river for most of the day.Up to Thursday, protesters were still congregating in the area of the bridge in what was described as a “tense standoff” with police and defence force personnel.Some temporary residents and foreign nationals are said to be leaving the south-western Guyana bauxite mining town.Guyana’s President Donald Ramotar says an investigation into the matter will be opened once calm has been restored.Caribbean 360 Newslast_img read more

first_imgAbout 350,000 people in Hong Kong currently hold British National (Overseas) passports, which allow visa-free access to Britain for up to six months, Johnson wrote. A pro-democracy demonstrator raises his British National Overseas (BNO) passports during a protest against new national security legislation in Hong Kong, China June 1, 2020. TYRONE SIU/REUTERS/FILE Another 2.5 million people would be eligible to apply for one. (AP) “Many people in Hong Kong fear their way of life – which China pledged to uphold – is under threat,” he wrote in an article for The Times newspaper and the South China Morning Post. LONDON – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Tuesday he would offer millions of Hong Kongers visas and a possible route to UK citizenship if China persists with its national security law.last_img read more